My hens attack my mom

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by CovertS2, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. CovertS2

    CovertS2 In the Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2012
    Help! I have three chickens that are great for me, but lately the have been really aggressive towards my mom. She does most of the taking care of them, and when she goes into their area, they attack her legs and even jump up to bite her arms! My dad says to kick them? If this isn't resolved soon, my mom might get rid of them! I need advice!
     
  2. 12chickenlover3

    12chickenlover3 Chirping

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    Jan 27, 2013
    Maybe have your mom feed them treats threw the fence. Last year I had 2 pullets attack me. And a week before a rooster spurred me, it wasn't gonna happen again! I just kicked them and they stood down and there were no problems after that. So maybe it insnt such a bad idea.
     
  3. candyNflowers

    candyNflowers In the Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2013
    Albany, Oregon
    My Coop
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,164
    917
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Why is your mom taking care of them if they behave better for you? That being said, if chickens are known to display aggression, the first line of defense is to keep all skin covered: long pants, closed toe/heel shoes, long sleeves and gloves when tending them. Then, if they do peck, at least it won't hurt. The most important thing is to establish dominance over the offending hens. Most likely the dominant hen of the bunch is the worst offender. Start with her, and when she pecks, grab her by the scruff of the neck (If you have to, chase her down to catch her) and hold her down to the ground until she ceases to struggle. Ideally, when you let go of her, she will maintain that head down position before she decides it's ok to get up and continue with her chicken business. Repeat as often as necessary. If needed, one can be held down with each hand. Most likely, the 3rd one will look on with interest. Also, consider what is going on in the coop before the aggression starts. Is it related to feeding, egg gathering, territorial issues? Try to think like a chicken and figure out what is setting them off. Is your mother unintentionally moving in a threatening manner? After she gets the dominance issue solved, it would be a good idea to offer them treats to keep them busy while tending to their needs. A flock working on treats is too busy to attack their caregiver.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,164
    917
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Why is your mom taking care of them if they behave better for you? That being said, if chickens are known to display aggression, the first line of defense is to keep all skin covered: long pants, closed toe/heel shoes, long sleeves and gloves when tending them. Then, if they do peck, at least it won't hurt. The most important thing is to establish dominance over the offending hens. Most likely the dominant hen of the bunch is the worst offender. Start with her, and when she pecks, grab her by the scruff of the neck (If you have to, chase her down to catch her) and hold her down to the ground until she ceases to struggle. Ideally, when you let go of her, she will maintain that head down position before she decides it's ok to get up and continue with her chicken business. Repeat as often as necessary. If needed, one can be held down with each hand. Most likely, the 3rd one will look on with interest. Also, consider what is going on in the coop before the aggression starts. Is it related to feeding, egg gathering, territorial issues? Try to think like a chicken and figure out what is setting them off. Is your mother unintentionally moving in a threatening manner? After she gets the dominance issue solved, it would be a good idea to offer them treats to keep them busy while tending to their needs. A flock working on treats is too busy to attack their caregiver.
     

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