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My Muscovies are trying to pip - Pictures

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by casportpony, Dec 31, 2013.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    but they are shrink wrapped! [​IMG] The first one managed to get through the inner membrane, but couldn't reach the shell to pip. The second one couldn't get through the inner membrane and was peeping! Of course I decided to help, now both have had their shells opened and their membranes moistened with sterile saline.

    -Kathy
     
  2. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Aww good thing you were there to help, hope they will make it all the way. [​IMG]
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    The one that couln't pip internally sounds like it might have aspirated some fluid, so we'll see. Another problem I have now is that there are other eggs with them, but they are many days behind, so do I set the humidity higher for the two then lower it for the rest once they hatch? Wish I had more experience. :(

    -Kathy
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Okay this member has had excellent advise on bators and hatching Lacrystol maybe shoot her a PM. She posts on the call duck hatching thread.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Here are the two that I helped. Both are from nest #2 which had just these two and they were ice cold:

    This is the one that was peeping but hadn't pipped internally (egg#2)
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here are 10 eggs from nest #3 that are under a hen.

    [​IMG]

    Egg #9 looks like it's lost too much weight to me.
    [​IMG]


    These are what's left from nest #4 which had 11 ice cold eggs, now there are just seven, but #7 looks dead. These are now in the incubator.
    [​IMG]


    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  6. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Does it look like the 2 that are open will make it? How are they progressing?
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    They aren't progressing... Not only was #1 shrink wrapped, it is malpostioned with it's foot over it's head.

    [​IMG]

    Source: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm095
    Malpositions

    Investigation has demonstrated that the incidence of embryos unable to hatch due to malpostions varies from 1.2 to 1.8%, with an average of 1.5%. Malpositioned embryos are unable to pip the eggshell and escape due to improper positioning within the egg in the hatcher. It is interesting to note that numerous malpositions have been described, with some embryos exhibiting only one form of malposition and others experiencing combinations of malpositions. The majority of eggs with malpositioned embryos, as found in hatch residue, included embryos dead in shell, probably resulting from exhaustion and/or lack of oxygen. A smaller number of eggs contained live embryos trying to pip. Loss of embryos due to malpositions may be costly; therefore, it is important to routinely monitor the percent of the embryos not hatching. If the incidence due to malpositions exceeds the standard, corrective measures must be taken. Table 1 summarizes the most common malpositions present in routine egg breakouts from the common broiler breeder crosses currently used in the industry. The incidences vary for the light and medium breeder cross lines.

    Table 1.
    Incidence of the common malpositions
    Malposition #

    Description of the malposition

    %

    1

    Head between thighs

    12.5
    2

    Head in the small end of egg

    7.5
    3

    Head under left wing

    7.5
    4

    Head not directed toward air cell

    4.5
    5

    Feet over head

    20.0
    6

    Beak above right wing

    48.0

    An embryo provided an optimum environment for development will position itself around 17-18 days of incubation for hatch. The proper position is with the head under the right wing with the head directed toward the aircell in the large end of the egg. The results of this study demonstrate that malposition # 6, which is beak above the right wing, constitutes almost 50% of the malpositions, followed by position # 5, feet over head with a frequency of 20%.
    There are numerous reasons that malpositions occur. In a normal population, the incidence should not exceed 2.0%. If the incidence is elevated, breeder and egg management practices must be investigated and appropriate changes made to resolve the problem. Common reasons for increased incidences of malpositions are:
    • Eggs are set with small end up. As part of a monitoring program, check eggs in the egg room or in the setters to ensure that eggs have been set correctly.
    • Advancing breeder hen age and shell quality problems.
    • Egg turning frequency and angle are not adequate. Proper frequency of turning through a 45 degree angle assists the embryo to position for hatch. The standard turning rate in the setter is 1 per hour.
    • Inadequate percent humidity loss of eggs in the setter. Acceptable weight loss of eggs from setting to transfer is 11-14%.
    • Inadequate air cell development, improper temperature and humidity regulation, and insufficient ventilation in the incubator or hatcher.
    • Imbalanced feeds, elevated levels of mycotoxins, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.
    • Exposure to lower than recommended temperatures in the last stage of incubation.
     
  8. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Okay so what can you do for this lil one? I didn't see anything about helping when this happens is it still alive? seems to me there ought to be something like opening the shell more?
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    What I was thinking of doing was giving it until midnight and checking it again, maybe peel away more, maybe not, but will definitely help them out by tomorrow am. Since I've never seen one take longer than 24 hours to go from peeping in the shell to hatching, I'm thinking it will be okay, but I'm just guessing...

    -Kathy
     
  10. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Just makes me want to help, looking at it contorted like that. I hope it all goes well and you don't have to do a thing. [​IMG] I know it's best to let them get out on their own.
     

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