my neighbor's chickens meeting my chickens--advice?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by bucket&spoon, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. bucket&spoon

    bucket&spoon Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Upstate NY
    my chickens are here!
    as of this afternoon, we have 6 2-month chickens in our new coop. my neighbors also have chickens, maybe 10 or so, and they have lived here for a couple of years. they come over to our property all the time. both of us have roosters. i'm wondering what will happen when they get old enough to free range (we live on 100 acres).
    my current plan is to build an enclosed fenced area for my chickens and allow them free access to that, but not free range, for at least a month. is that sufficient? will the roosters fight? are their chickens going to come into my coop and vice versa?
    i don't want to give their chickens any more incentive to come over; their rooster is really aggressive. i've been trying to convince them to put him down since he has attacked me and several other people. i even offered to set them up with another rooster!
    advice please!!
     
  2. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    Seems like you either keep yours in a covered run, or there will be a fight between roosters and yours will lose (unless you help him out will a well placed two by four to the head of your neighbor's rooster - though that could make for some bad neighbor relations).
     
  3. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    wait - you live on 100 acres how close are the neighbors? You could get a livestock guard dog to keep theirs away...
     
  4. NottinghamChicks

    NottinghamChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    well, you have been really nice to your neighbor by not trapping their nasty rooster and now that you are getting your own it is their responsibility to keep him secure in their own yard. They should place a fence along the property line and if they do not let them know that you will have to take matters into your own hands for the safety of your chickens on your property.

    Very inconsiderate of them to not take care of this issue earlier. I am shcked that they were aware of this issue and you tried so hard to be a good neighbor despite it. Warn them one more time in a friendly manner but let them know you mean business.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  5. bucket&spoon

    bucket&spoon Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Upstate NY
    they are the only other house on the 100 acres. at some point the land was owned jointly, so they have a little cut-out of our property. my rooster will be bigger than his when he's grown up... but the most aggressive rooster wins? even if they meet through a fence for a while?
    i may lobby harder that their rooster should die. roosters that attack people are no good.
     
  6. NottinghamChicks

    NottinghamChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    An agressive rooster should be eliminated and made into a pot pie. Unless he is really old yours will not have a chance.
     
  7. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    It is possible, that they may tolerate each other if the new rooster is raised up from a chick in a fenced enclosure right there on the property and there are plenty of new hens with him.

    There are just no guarantees one way or the other.

    Either way, the issue isn't how the roosters may or may not get along, the issue is really that their rooster is attacking you!!
     
  8. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Aug 25, 2008
    SC
    The attacking rooster is a serious issue, you are liable for any injuries while on your property.

    I see the solution being the neighbors keep their chickens on their property and you keep your chickens or your property. The old saying about good fences making good neighbors is quite true. I wouldn't want the neighbor's chickens on my property- they might carry disease or parasites.

    It's difficult to change things like this, but if everyone can be cordial and cooperative, it can be done. Best of luck that all goes well. [​IMG]
     
  9. bucket&spoon

    bucket&spoon Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Upstate NY
    thanks for all your input! i talked with my neighbors and they're going to put that rooster down within the month (the husband is traveling and the wife doesn't want to do it). if they get a new rooster, hopefully he will be on even terms with my little guy; more like meeting on neutral territory. i won't let mine out of a fenced area until that happens. i might even be able to set them up with a rooster raised with my little guy.
    i don't mind their chickens over here. hopefully everyone is healthy. their birds look great and lay well. i've taken care of them before (in fact they inspired me to get my own.) you just have to chase the rooster off and then the hens are sweet.

    my chickens have been here 2 days now; i gave them a handful of earthworms, grubs and slugs i found digging in my garden, and some weed sprouts, and i laughed so hard at them running around to eat them! one of my little hens jumps on my head every time i bend over. [​IMG]
     
  10. jaj121159

    jaj121159 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 27, 2010
    Northeast Nebraska
    Sounds like you got it figured out. But I still would check with Cooperative Extension, the New York Department of Ag or some other agency to see what the laws are regarding roaming livestock. Yes, chickens are livestock. In some states it is your duty to keep them off your property, some other states do it different. It a good idea to keep neighboring livestock of any species apart for biosecurity reasons. You don't want your chickens to catch something from your neighbor's flock.
     

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