My problem is... awhile back I had got some chickens that just randomly died.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by SizzleQueen, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. SizzleQueen

    SizzleQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And for months I have done research trying to figure out why. They didn't act unhealthy, not all of them. Some of them just seemed to die randomly the next day with no signs..

    Does anyone have any clue what it might be? I contacted the breeder furious, but I think my hot headed anger made it so she didn't respond. Weird thing was, I had them for awhile too. So perhaps it was something on my land? Because I had them since they were about 4 weeks old.. and they lived to make it up to about 3 months and that's when they started to randomly die.

    Since then ive scrubbed my coop, and everything in it.. and now the chickens I have are just fine and I put medicine in there water to clear out any bacteria too.

    Let me know what you guys think.. I wish I had called the vet out.. but there was only one who was having some trouble standing, she would walk slow, hunched over, and sometimes would just fall back on her feet. I thought it was a weight issue at first, but before I could call the vet out, she died.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    It could be lots of things and after that much time, it was likely something you did, unless they just weren't robust.

    What were you feeding them? What type of feed?
     
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  3. SizzleQueen

    SizzleQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hmm, well I kept them on the feed she was giving them, and at the time that was chick starter.. then when they reached about 16 weeks I started to feed them what I have always fed my chickens which was a all organic feed (I mixed it in with their chick starter for about a week or so to let them adjust)

    They had their water which always was cleaned and scrubbed out, and I put anti-bacterial medicine in all my chickens water just to clear out anything that could possibly be in their water which is extremely doubtful to begin with. (This one done since the beginning, always have for my pervious chickens and always positive results. Again ive never had this happen so that's why im curious)

    I was thinking perhaps it could be my fault, but I have raised chickens now for two years, same process, and they all are thriving besides the 6 I randomly lost. So that's why I am at a lost.
     
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  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Prime age for coccidiosis, maybe Merek's, who knows. The possibilities are many and the only way to know would have been to send one for a necropsy. Anything we come up with here at this point will just be a guessing game.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    That was going to be my next point. If a chicken randomly dies, that's one thing, but if more than one dies in short order a necropsy is definitely in order and the only way to know what killed them. Anything else would only be a guess and likely a wrong guess. As cafarmgirl said, there are so many things that kill suddenly without other symptoms.

    At 16 weeks you changed their feed to what you always gave them. I'm assuming that means a layer feed about 16% protein and 4% calcium. Is that true?

    How's the ventilation? I don't mean 'good' or 'bad'. I mean how large are the openings in square footage.

    Here's a good thread for submission.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/799747/how-to-send-a-bird-for-a-necropsy-pictures
    That detail isn't always necessary but you need to contact your state lab and see how they want it prepared. If you're within driving distance, you can just carry the bird there but the fresher it is the better the diagnosis.
     
  6. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Did something happen around the time they died that could have stressed them? Some diseases are triggered by stress especially in adolescents. I had the exact same thing happen to the first three chicks I bought, they suddenly died at about 4 months of age. The only change here was that I did acquire two 5 year old retired show bantams from an NPIP breeder. The bantams have always been VERY healthy but they could have been asymptomatic carriers for something that the 4 month olds couldn't handle (also a lot of show folks breed for resistance and many don't believe in vaccinating so their birds may have naturally healthy immune systems).
     
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  7. SizzleQueen

    SizzleQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nothing that I can think of, everything was the same or them growing up. I guess it really is just a guessing game at this point and I shouldn't worry about it but so much. Thanks everyone for the input and help .. I appreciate it. [​IMG]
     
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  8. SizzleQueen

    SizzleQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have already buried them and it has been months now. Thank you though! I will keep this in mind if I ever run into this problem, but this was a first time, and I am praying it is the last.. can't stand the fact any chicks I have received and raised have been the healthiest chickens you'd ever seen with how they run and pluck around.. [​IMG]
     
  9. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Since there are so many things that can affect them, just like humans, one needs diagnosis with lab work - not just speculation.

    I don't mean to offend but if you got sick, would you ask your friends what was wrong with you or would you go to the doctor? All animals are no different from us. Bacterium, virals, protozoa, fungus, and nutritional problems affect them. Unless there's lab work, who knows?
     
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