my Rhode island reds are being very aggressive

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by jessbrum, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. jessbrum

    jessbrum Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm not sure what it is but my Rhode island reds have never been mean or aggressive towards me or each other until I put my two ameraucana babies with them.they have a new house and run more than enough for all of them and they are still acting like butt heads. Not sure what you do any more except start eating more chicken if it comes down to it.any ones help would be awesome.
     
  2. ludwigson

    ludwigson Just Hatched

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    From what friends tell me (I've never done it myself), integrating new birds into a flock is tricky and sometimes just can't be done. Chickens have a social order that is disrupted by new individuals. The aggressive behavior is an effort to establish a new social (pecking) order. From what I've read, either don't do it at all, or introduce the new chickens gradually--fencing them off, but allowing the birds to see each other. Large runs tend to minimize the conflict.
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Welcome to BYC

    When you introduce new birds into any situation, it causes a great disturbance "in the force". LOL
    Usually this settles down after awhile. Younger, smaller birds are at a severe disadvantage when scrapping and jousting with larger, older birds.
     
  4. jessbrum

    jessbrum Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm starting to think I'm gonna have to remove them.I'm gonna wait a couple more days to see what happens.
    I have a pretty big run for them I guess they just really don't like new comers.
     
  5. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    You can not just throw new birds into an existing flock of chickens. There will be fighting, aggression and many times blood and injuries.

    You need to introduce new birds very slowly. In an established flock, there is a pecking order from the head leader on down to the lowest bird. When you add new birds, this order becomes upset and fighting will ensue. These new birds need to be the same size as the older hens. So if they are younger and smaller, you need to keep them separate until they are the same size and can defend themselves.

    When you do go to mix the new birds in, you need to keep them in a caged area within the flock or on the other side of a fence within the flock so ever body sees but nobody touches. This way they can sort of work out the pecking order from behind wire and no body gets hurt. The new birds need to stay separated for a couple to a few weeks. After this time period, the mixing should all go fairly well, with little aggression as they have worked much of the pecking order out already.

    Of course watch very closely for a few days after mixing in case there are still aggressions. And always intervene if it turns bloody.

    Good luck with your flock and enjoy BYC!
     
  6. jessbrum

    jessbrum Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 10, 2014
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    Thank y'all for the advise and help Looks like I'm gonna have my hands full with these girls until they decide to get along.
     
  7. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Hello :frow and Welcome To BYC! Good luck with your flock, integration usually takes quite awhile before everyone is happy.
     
  8. liz9910

    liz9910 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! Also, it is best to introduce them when they are of similar size. Good luck to you.
     
  9. herechilychiky

    herechilychiky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello, welcome to BYC!!! Good Luck..
     

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