My ROO

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by Grand-hen-ma, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Grand-hen-ma

    Grand-hen-ma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 25, 2010
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    Yesterday my Rooster woke us up with his very first cock-a-doodle-do! It feels like one of my children spoke their very first word!

    Does anyone know how old my girls need to be before I let them go on a date with my Roo? I'm not sure I'm ready or experienced yet raising chickens to have babies. I hear hatching eggs is very hard.

    Thanks
    Colette
     
  2. sfw2

    sfw2 Global Menace

    How old are your pullets? Are they the same age, breed and/or size as your roo? If so, you can probably start introducing them now. If they've been kept separate all this time, you might want to start by fencing off an area of your run and putting the roo in there. That will give them a chance to get acquainted, without freaking your "girls" out too much.
     
  3. QuinnP

    QuinnP Chillin' With My Peeps

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    YAYYYY!!! BIG GROUP HUG!!!!!!!!! *and a pat on the head for da roo*
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    If the pullets are the same age and general size of the cockerel, the time is now. A rooster completes a flock in a way that is hard to describe, but wonderful to watch.
    You won't have to worry about hatching chicks. Before that can happen a hen has to go broody and some hens never do. My rooster has been with my hens since they were day olds in the brooder and IMO, that's where he belongs.
    For someone without experience chicken matings can appear to be quite brutal, especially until the rooster gets the hang of it. Best to just walk away and let it happen. It will bother you alot more than it does the chickens I promise.
    I watched my 3 week old cockerel this morning as he listened to my adult rooster crow. I don't think it will be long before the little guy tries belting one out himself.
    Congrats on your first cockle-doodle-do. [​IMG]
     
  5. Grand-hen-ma

    Grand-hen-ma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you all for your replies. I appreciate the information and help. I honestly don't know the age of my girls or roo. My hubby and I were up in Chiefland and decided to stop at a local flea market. It was raining cats and dogs so we ate there and decided to walk around. We happened across a pet store there and saw the chickens. They were beautiful and already laying eggs. The lady that runs the shop said they were young and had been giving eggs every day for the last few weeks. Then she suggested a roo so we looked at him with his 2 sisters. They were in a large glass cage. No lights on them and they were full of pin feathers with a few of them opened here and there. We fell in love with them all and brought them home. So I have no idea how old they truly are. And I will have to go look up the meaning of broody. And when the time comes, I will just walk away and let nature take her course. I don't like to see my girls hurt or fight so if the mating is as bad as you say, then I don't want to see a thing.

    Thanks again.
    Colette
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    If the rooster and hens were together when you got them, it is best to keep them together. Chickens have what is called a pecking order. It is common in nature with animals that live together, such as wolves in packs or cattle in herds. It is not that there is one dominant animal and all others are subservient to that dominant one. Every animal in the flock, pack, or herd knows its place socially. They all either rank higher or lower than all the others. That way they know who gets the privileges of rank without having to fight about it all the time. However, determining that position initially does involve fighting or pecking and can be quite violent, sometimes even deadly. If they have been living together, that is already worked out, but if you keep them apart long enough for them to forget where they rank, the pecking order will have to be reestablished. It is usually less complicated when it is a rooster being introduced to a flock of hens if the rooster is at least as old as the hens or fully grown, but there can still be violence.

    Broody is when the hen gets an attack of hormones and decides to raise a family. Different hens exhibit it differently, but in general she spends almost all her time sitting on the nest, whether there are eggs in there or not, and she gets extremely defensive about her nest. There is no guarantee that any of your hens will ever go broody. Some do regularly but many have had the broodiness bred out of them. They either will or will not go broody whether there is a rooster with them or not. Doesn't matter.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Grand-hen-ma

    Grand-hen-ma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, you have been very helpful. I still have soooo much to hearn.
     

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