My rooster has diarrhea and maggots!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jan12, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. jan12

    jan12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This morning when I let my chickens out, I noticed my favorite rooster, Slim, looked really diminished with dirty tail feathers. I thought, "Oh no, that looks like pretty bad diarrhea.." The diarrhea looked black. So I put him in a separate cage. When I examined his rear, he was covered in maggots!!! Eeewwww! I had a surgery scheduled at 10am today, so I knew I didn't have much time. When I had a spare few minutes, I went to wash the maggots off with water. Thank heavens I had rubber gloves on! There were so many maggots, I had to pick them out of his wounds. He had diarrhea caked all down the underside from his vent, so I washed it all off with baby shampoo (that's all I could think to use in such short time) and picked a whole lot of maggots from inside his flesh. Yeah, the flies were blue green, so I'm sure there were a lot of the 'bad' maggots that eat normal flesh. Anyway, after I managed to wash as much of the maggots off as I can, I had to rush off to my outpatient surgery, albeit 15 minutes late. I just couldn't leave him like that. I don't know how I mustered up enough courage to tackle the maggots. They were so gross!! But I had to. Before I left I used powder Sevin to kill flies and/or larva. That was all I had on hand that might do something. I know it is probably not good to do, but these were desperate times.

    I came back from surgery to him being swarmed by a ton of flies, so I went to the local feed store and picked up some Sulmet and Duramycin as well as a perimeter fly repellant. I put the Sulmet in his water and he drank so much of it a soon as I put the waterer in the cage, so I figured he was dehydrated. When he was done, I took him and on inspection, I saw millions of (what I assume were) fly eggs on the shafts of the feathers! They weren't there before... Omg... They were everywhere. I tried washing them off but they didn't come off easily. I finally put him in a tub of warm water and dish soap to get the rest off. There were still a few eggs here and there. I cut a few feathers with chunks of eggs on them, and poured peroxide on his wounds to clean them, and then rubbed some Betadine on the wounds. I also noticed that he started gurgling like water in his lungs. I figured it must have been either water from his crop that flowed back in the wrong direction while I had him on his side or water from washing. It was getting dark, so I blow dried him mostly dry. It took forever to dry his feathers! By this time, I was hurting from the earlier surgery and I could stand no more. So I put him in a crate in the garage for the night and I went inside, took a cleansing shower and laid down. I couldn't move anymore in pain.

    Later in the evening after much research online (and the pain was moderate but better), I put some antibiotic ointment on his wounds. First thing tomorrow, I'm going back to the feed store to look for some VIP or SWAT and a fly spray for dogs. But I am worried... He is gurgling and coughing pretty bad now, but his diarrhea seems to look slightly better. I never saw blood nor worms in his diarrhea. I feel like I did the best I could do. I don't have a chicken vet near me... I hope he makes it! He was eating and drinking earlier before the final wash-down.

    I am working on the assumption that this was originally coccidiosis or some bacterial infection that caused the diarrhea, and the diarrhea caked on his feathers causing the flies to lay the maggots. I know this assumption could be wrong, but I'm medicating for elimination of possibilities. If anyone has any helpful tips or suggestions, please let me know. I could use some help!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    First he needs to be inside somewhere the flies cannot get to him. Then I would post on "Emergencies, diseases, injuries, cures, thread."

    I recall reading about a lady with a silkie, that underwent the same problem yours has. It seemed like the flushing and removing maggots went on forever. It was quite a while till that battle was over, and her little roo finally got his health back.

    It takes a lot of guts to work with maggots, gosh, they are hideous. Chicken people seem to get the strength to do things to save their chicken buddies. I applaud you for having the fortitude to continue this especially when you are suffering the effects of surgery - yourself.

    I have read that maggots once inside can migrate to all organs of the body and infect the brain as well. I don't know if there is some internal vet drug that would kill them . Could you call a vet to ask that. Maybe explaining your situation he would call a prescription in to your pharmacy.

    Is anyone around able to assist you? I never can find assistance but, maybe your friends/family/neighbors would pitch in.[​IMG]
     
  3. jan12

    jan12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2013
    South Western Connecticut
    Thanks for your reply! I wish I had some chicken buddies to help me, but even if I did, I don't know if I could ask them to endure such a gross procedure! I think that I can make myself do it because they're my chicken, and I can't stand for them to suffer like that.

    I can't ask my husband to help either. His solution was, "Take care of him!! Or I will!" Of course we argued on the way to surgery. I think he gave up when I laid a guilt trip on him. LOL :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
  4. jan12

    jan12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2013
    South Western Connecticut
    Sadness... I just went to move his crate to the screen porch to keep the flies out in the morning, and he was dead. Probably asphyxiation because his comb was looking purple and he was gurgling really bad the last time I checked on him. I wish I could have saved him... He was a really nice rooster. RIP, Slim. :'(
     
  5. Shabana

    Shabana Chillin' With My Peeps

    So sorry to hear about Slim :(
    You did everything you could and fly strike happens very fast. It can be over for the animal in a couple of days so don't beat yourself up.

    I had a rabbit that was pretty over weight and couldn't clean himself properly so I had to wash his bum every few days. Fly strike was always an issue and in the end I kept him as a house bunny so they couldn't get to him.

    Maybe there's room in your flock now for another little boy :)

    Best wishes x
     

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