My yard is a baron wasteland!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by aubreynoramarie, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    So I freerange my birds in my backyard, which happens to be such a desert that weeds dont even bother to show their faces. Its dirt dirt and more dirt. In the spring we get littl bits of grass but they dont last long. My question here is what can i do with my yard that can keep the chickens happy and interested but wont be completely destroyed by them and the goats?

    I feed them in the morning so they always have the chicken feed but thats it. They will munch on the goat chow every now and then but mostly they prefer their own feed. I was hoping by letting them have run of the yard they could find bugs and leaves and whatever and be happy healthy birds. Unfortunately there doesnt seem to be anything interesting left. what can i do?
     
  2. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Do they have an enclosed run? If so, pen them up a little more in the spring and give the grass a chance to get established. When I first started with chickens, I let them have free run of my yard from the time I let them out to the time I closed them in at night. It didn't take them long to destroy my flower beds or the grass. And in my experience, there aren't many bugs if they don't have grass to hide in. Now I only let them range a few hours a day and I have my green grass and flower beds (and they have flowers in 'em too! Go figure [​IMG] ) back. That's what worked for me. Good luck!
     
  3. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    Thanks, no they dont have an enclosed run but i could probably enclose something to grow grass in!
     
  4. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    I don't know the Reno climate, but would a salad bar work? Or some shrubs/plants surrounded by wire, so the chickens can peck at it without killing it? Or put down something on the ground and turn it over every morning to expose the bugs? Or start a compost pile, mine like to dig through it looking for worms.

    Imp
     
  5. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

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    Have you tried Kentucky bluegrass seed? We threw some in our yard after a major construction project and it went wild. I know our climates are very different but it has survived high temps and a pretty bad drought here. Just keep your animals away for a couple of weeks so it can establish itself.
     
  6. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    good suggestions guys, thanks! I love the salad bar and will definitely keep my eyes out for some kentucky blue this spring [​IMG]
     
  7. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

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    Quote:I found a pic. This was taken last winter. We had to wait three weeks for a lawnmower part so it had a chance to really grow. The kids used the area to do a zombie photo project for school.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    That looks nice. I wish the lawn (um moss) would grow like that here.

    Imp
     
  9. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    ahahaha! thats awesome but i dont really want to LOSE my chickens! hopefully wont need a mower with the goats in tow
     
  10. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

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    Quote:We actually did lose chickens in there. You can't see it in the pic but my big BO is sneaking up on the kids. I didn't notice until I saw the same scene at a different angle. [​IMG]
     

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