My young guinea was attacked by the older guineas.

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by SunnySouth, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. SunnySouth

    SunnySouth New Egg

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    Oct 4, 2012
    When I found him huddled in the coop, he let me pick him up with no resistence. His head was bleeding and his eyes looked injured. I put some vitamin A&D ointment on him and put him in a cage by himself. I put some fabric in the cage and also covered him with a warm towel. Now after 2 days, he has perked up but the gnats and flies are really bothering him. Is there anything I can do to keep the gnats off him?
     
  2. critters

    critters Chillin' With My Peeps

    is this cage outside?? if it is it would be best, I think, to also be next to or in the guinea coop
    if you have one or at least where he can see the other guineas and them him....the guinea should
    eat at the gnats....you might want to check to see that he doesn't have a worst,unseen, injury....
    and maybe change the bedding to shavings to obsorb his waste and maybe help cut back on
    the gnats?? just a guess..?? good luck!
     
  3. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've never had to use any type of fly repellent on a Guinea before, so I can't recommend one that I know would to be safe to use... but you could try dusting him with poultry dust and see if that helps repel the bugs that are bothering him.

    I agree, he should be caged near/with the flock so he has a better chance of being accepted once he's all better... if they cannot see him while he's caged/healing then chances are he'll be picked on way worse once he's re-integrated. I'd keep him caged until his wounds are complete healed, because the other Guineas will be attracted to the blood and scabs, causing more injuries.

    Plain neosporin (without pain relief) will help with the healing... and it won't hurt his eyes if any gets in them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  4. SunnySouth

    SunnySouth New Egg

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    Oct 4, 2012
    Thank you for your advice. I do have him near the flock, however he cannot see them nor can they see him. I'll move him closer to them immediately.
     
  5. SunnySouth

    SunnySouth New Egg

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    Oct 4, 2012
    I will definitely try the poultry dust. I don't know who sells it but I will search for it. I will use the neosporin on him today. Thank you for responding with your good advice.
     
  6. jbirds2012

    jbirds2012 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    there is also something called "bluecoat" it can be found at tractor supply or your local feed store. i would ask them what is best to put on bird injuries. i hope all works out ok for ya. :)
     
  7. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's called Blu-Kote... and can be found in most feed stores that sell medications for horses and livestock (Tractor Supply carries it here in my area). It instantly stains everything dark purple and has a strong alcohol base tho... so be careful not to get any in his eyes. And it does work well to hide/cover wounds/scabs, but in this case the plain neosporin would be my medication of choice for at least a few days tho, since his eyes were also injured.
     
  8. SunnySouth

    SunnySouth New Egg

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    Oct 4, 2012
    My young bird has died. It happened about a week after I rescued him from the other birds. I discovered after more examination, that he had been blinded. There must have been other internal injuries to cause the death. I want to thank you all for the advice you gave me. I guess guineas are territorial. I fussed at the older birds for several days. I know that is stupid but it made me feel better.
     
  9. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry for your loss Sunny [​IMG] . I would have fussed at the flock too.
     
  10. skidmld

    skidmld New Egg

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    Next time you try to introduce a young one to the flock, try leaning a piece of plywood or some other kind of board up against the wall. Try to leave just enough room for the young one to get in there and hide. Sometimes (not always) that gives it enough protection for it to be accepted. This works with chickens too.
     

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