Mycoplasm Gallisepticum

Oct 20, 2020
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Hey there, i recently purchased 10 acres of land thats been in my famiky for over 50 years. There has not been any chickens on this land for over 30 years. I was given two Plymouth Rock hens (4 years old) from a friend of mine that has a small chicken farm which she hatched them herself and she is NPIP certified. About a month after having them they started getting the bubble eyes and snotty noses. The Vet gave me meds and said it was Mycoplasm Gallisepitcum. They got over it and now a month later have it again. Ive read where they will nkw br a carrier of this disease. But how and where in the world would they pick this up from? Any help with ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Wyorp Rock

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I was given two Plymouth Rock hens (4 years old) from a friend of mine that has a small chicken farm which she hatched them herself and she is NPIP certified.
About a month after having them they started getting the bubble eyes and snotty noses. Bet gave me meds and said it was Mycoplasm Gallisepitcum. They got over it and now a month later have it again. Ive read where they will nkw br a carrier of this disease. But how and where in the world would they pick this up from?
Welcome To BYC! Glad you are here!
What medication did she give you?

I'm just going off the info you have provided and making some assumptions here... It seems like you have answered your own question. Your friend gave you the hen. They became sick, your friend (Bet?) gave you medications to treat them and told you it was MG.
If she had medications and was able to tell you the disease, then likely she already knew the flock/birds had MG - they came with the illness. Birds with MG are carriers for life and can become symptomatic anytime, but especially during times of stress - like a move to a new home/environment.

Talk to your friend about the disease since she does seem to know about it. I'm sorry that they are sick yet again. There may be secondary infection from another source as well.
4 yr old hens may also be starting to have some other issues that are weakening them - are they molting?

Where are you located in the world?
 
Oct 20, 2020
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Located in Texas. My friend did not give me the meds or tell me what disease it was. My local vet (i put Bet in original post and have corrected it) is the one who gave me meds (Nuflor injections and Denegard for water). Her flock was negative for MG when they were tested for her NPIP certification. Only thing I can think of is its from wild birds.
 

Wyorp Rock

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Located in Texas. My friend did not give me the meds or tell me what disease it was. My local vet (i put Bet in original post and have corrected it) is the one who gave me meds (Nuflor injections and Denegard for water). Her flock was negative for MG when they were tested for her NPIP certification. Only thing I can think of is its from wild birds.
Ah, the old auto correct thing LOL

OK so the vet tested them and gave you a diagnosis of MG?
Sometimes with an MG positive flock folks have found that they need to give the Denagard once a month for 3 days to help prevent symptoms.
MG is fairly common and could be spread from wild birds - really would be hard to trace it.
Good to know that your NPIP tests for MG, not all state require it.
If it is MG, then closing the flock would be a good idea. This means none in or out until your existing flock dies off, then leave the coop empty for a few weeks and begin again.
Some folks do bring in new birds knowing that they may become symptomatic - newbies will be considered carriers automatically.
 

Eggcessive

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Would it be possible to give the 2 chickens back to your friend, and then start over in the spring with chicks from a hatchery or feed store? Just because she is NPIP, which is tested for occasionally, doesn’t mean that there is no MG on her property. People get chickens online or locally all the time from NPIP breeders. They test mainly for pullorum and typhoid.

MG is only alive in the environment for about 3 days once the chickens are gone. To be just starting out, and you already have signs of a chronic resp disease would be discouraging. I only get chickens from hatcheries or feed stores because of the chance of bringing in someone else’s problem. Also the age of the hens, may mean that they are close to the end of their laying years.
 

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