Mycoplasma Gallisepticum

Chickenheadmate

Songster
Mar 4, 2018
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Mansfield, TX
Would someone please tell me about this? I'm pretty sure it's what my flock has. How did it show up or how does it usually show up?

Could it be from them sharing the same dust bath spot as my last flock?

Been treating with Tylan, thanks to the recommendation of a BYC user, for a few days now and they seem to be doing better now.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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MG is a bacteria that causes respiratory symptoms such as bubbly eyes and discharge from the beak, swollen sinuses, and often difficulty breathing. It's often associated with other viruses and attacks when a chicken's immune system is lowered from climate stresses or other illness.

It's very contagious from bird to bird. The bacteria can last several weeks in damp soil and litter, but a bleach solution can eliminate it on hard surfaces. When it's on dry dust in the direct sun, it won't last as long, but if it's been only a few weeks since your last chickens were in that dirt, there's a chance the bacteria could still be lurking. If it's been several months, especially in strong sunlight, don't worry about it.
 

Eggcessive

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Usually mycoplasma gallisepticum or MG is alive on equipment, clothes, shoes, etc for only 3-4 days, once a carrier chicken or other bird is gone from the premises. It is fairly common in backyard flocks, in wild birds, and most hatcheries are not totally MG negative. I think many chickens can resist it, but if they are stressed and exposed to a carrier bird or the disease organism on someone or their shoes, then an outbreak is common. Once they have MG, they and possibly the whole flock become carriers for life.
 

Chickenheadmate

Songster
Mar 4, 2018
604
372
201
Mansfield, TX
Usually mycoplasma gallisepticum or MG is alive on equipment, clothes, shoes, etc for only 3-4 days, once a carrier chicken or other bird is gone from the premises. It is fairly common in backyard flocks, in wild birds, and most hatcheries are not totally MG negative. I think many chickens can resist it, but if they are stressed and exposed to a carrier bird or the disease organism on someone or their shoes, then an outbreak is common. Once they have MG, they and possibly the whole flock become carriers for life.
Must i get rid of my flock? If they are going to be life carriers?
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,283
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Oh, goodness NO! Many of us are in the same boat, only with viruses in our flocks that are far more deadly and have no treatment.

While we always need to be aware that our chickens carry a disease that can ruin other flocks if it gets away from us, we adjust. We practice good bio-security to contain these viruses. My chickens carry the leucosis virus (avian leukemia), and it can cause tumors and death.

However, with good care to minimize stress, keeping clean coops and runs to minimize bacteria, good nutrition to maximize their immune responses, most chickens carrying these diseases can lead full and even long lives. I have several very old chickens, the oldest being over ten years and in very good health.

I keep an assortment of antibiotics on hand to treat immediately any chicken coming down with a secondary infection. You may seldom see one of your chickens with a respiratory illness, but you will want to keep the antibiotics on hand if one ever does start to show symptoms.
 

Eggcessive

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That would be drastic if you had a lot of birds. The only way to rid the disease is to cull sick birds, and close the flock to new birds. There is a vaccine abailable. You really need to get some PCR testing done to confirm whatever disease you are dealing with, and I would contact your vet, state vet, or local extension agent to ask how to go about that. MG can be common in backyard flocks. Read all of the articles you can, and go from there on what to do.
 

Chickenheadmate

Songster
Mar 4, 2018
604
372
201
Mansfield, TX
That would be drastic if you had a lot of birds. The only way to rid the disease is to cull sick birds, and close the flock to new birds. There is a vaccine abailable. You really need to get some PCR testing done to confirm whatever disease you are dealing with, and I would contact your vet, state vet, or local extension agent to ask how to go about that. MG can be common in backyard flocks. Read all of the articles you can, and go from there on what to do.
I meant to ask you, is PCR a test you can get online?
Tried looking it up and not sure I found it
 

Chickenheadmate

Songster
Mar 4, 2018
604
372
201
Mansfield, TX
What do you guys do when you bring a new bird into your flock? Just come to terms that the new chicken will get the virus?
Oh, goodness NO! Many of us are in the same boat, only with viruses in our flocks that are far more deadly and have no treatment.

While we always need to be aware that our chickens carry a disease that can ruin other flocks if it gets away from us, we adjust. We practice good bio-security to contain these viruses. My chickens carry the leucosis virus (avian leukemia), and it can cause tumors and death.

However, with good care to minimize stress, keeping clean coops and runs to minimize bacteria, good nutrition to maximize their immune responses, most chickens carrying these diseases can lead full and even long lives. I have several very old chickens, the oldest being over ten years and in very good health.

I keep an assortment of antibiotics on hand to treat immediately any chicken coming down with a secondary infection. You may seldom see one of your chickens with a respiratory illness, but you will want to keep the antibiotics on hand if one ever does start to show symptoms.
 

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