Mystery Geese. Help solve the mystery!

Discussion in 'Geese' started by Auxesia, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. Auxesia

    Auxesia New Egg

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    Jan 1, 2013
    Chillingham, Australia
    Howdy. I live in Australia. I got some geese that were advertised as Pilgrims. I'm new to geese.

    Breeder had what looked to be two flocks. One flock, looked like pilgrims, with the typical grey females and white males. The other flock were mostly white and a few whites with large grey areas.
    The geese I got are around 10 weeks old. One isn't fully feathered, but almost done. I got a trio, supposedly a male and two females.
    She had two trios for sale. She had four grey females. One grey male, one white and grey male. I explained when we first talked that I thought pilgrims were sexed by colour, but she told me I was wrong and that sometimes they throw back to mix up those two colours. I know sometimes they throw back to white females,but grey males??
    I got the white and grey male and two grey females.

    When I got home and got thinking, it occurred to me that firstly, perhaps I was tricked, not that I care that much. But did she even sex them?
    This are my observations. Bare with me.

    Two of them have very skinny necks. I not sure if this is normal, or a feminine trait, because one of the skinny necks happens to belong to the supposed male (the white and grey one). 'He' also has brown eyes.
    The grey 'female' with the thicker neck has a white bean on her bill. The other two, skinny neck ones, have black beans on their bills.
    The aforementioned thick neck, white beaned 'female' also seems to stand up taller than the others.
    Here are some photos.
    Thanks you for your help!
    [​IMG]
    The white one with dark grey on back is supposedly a male.
    [​IMG]
    The one on the right is the female with the thicker neck and white bean.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Male, female with the thin neck, female with the thick neck.
     
  2. Auxesia

    Auxesia New Egg

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    Jan 1, 2013
    Chillingham, Australia
    No one? :-(
     
  3. flockman

    flockman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 6, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    They don't look like what I know as pilgrims. They almost look like pomeranians or a mix there of. I really don't know. Sorry!
     
  4. Going Bhonkers

    Going Bhonkers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
    SW Florida
    I haven't stumbled across geese that resemble yours. Hopefully members with more experience will chime in
     
  5. Going Bhonkers

    Going Bhonkers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
    SW Florida
  6. learycow

    learycow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2011
    Southern Maine
    Generally with Pilgrims (I am new to this breed but this is from what I've read and observed myself) the males are white and females are gray. They hatch these colors so they can be sexed as soon as they hatch.
    The females I've seen almost all have white on their heads. Usually its around their eyes and I've seen white going down their necks too. They almost look like a toulouse only with a white face (some have more white than others).
    The males are white with gray feathers mixed in here and there. My gander has gray wing feathers, but they shouldn't have large patches of gray like yours does. I would say that he is either a pomeranian or a saddleback mix of some sort.

    Here are pics of mine:

    [​IMG]

    In this picture you can see the white on the face of the female and the gray feathers on the ganders wingtips. From my understanding (colorwise) this is what Pilgrims should resemble.
    I hate to say it but I don't think the woman who sold you yours was being honest with you :(

    As far as gender goes, if those are mixes then the gray ones may not be females afterall. You will either have to wait for them to start laying eggs (to see how many females you have) or have them DNA sexed. And since its not a pilgrim, the white one has as much chance as being a female as the others.
     

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