N.p.i.p.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by danielle82, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    What are the benefits of being NPIP certified?
    I guess I'm not really sure what it is, I know it is to ensure healthy flocks. Is it once you are certified, you can only obtain birds from other npip flocks?
     
  2. mississippifarmboy

    mississippifarmboy collects slightly damaged strays

    I think you have to be certified to ship birds. Someone will have better info, we're just a little family farm, so not certified.
     
  3. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    oh, I didn't know you had to be npip to ship
     
  4. Baralak

    Baralak Chillin' With My Peeps

    NPIP in Louisiana is currently non manditory, but from the way the department of AG is talking, one day it may be manditory. NPIP is a simple blood test to ensure your flock tests negitive for Pullorum /typhoid. In the state of Louisiana it is free, and the state vet will send out someone to you for verification. Here is a post on our state website concerning a users experience with NPIP.

    http://www.louisianachickens.com/index.php/forum/5-chickens/229-npip-testing

    Well.. We are putting together a Poultry Expo in Louisiana. The Louisiana department of Ag requires all birds that come to the expo, to be NPIP certified, or if chicks, be from a NPIP certified flock.. Here is a little statement from the department of ag:

    We are on site at the State fair to ensure the birds have a current (60 days for in state, 30 for out of state) Certificate of Veterinary Inspection stating from your veterinarian that the birds being shown are free from obvious disease, AND a 9-2 USDA form that shows the birds you are offering to show or sell have been tested negatively for Pullorum /typhoid, OR come from a flock that is active in the voluntary NPIP flock program where the flock of origin has been tested within the past calendar year. As the birds are crated in the venue, we will check for respiratory illnesses, and fowl pox. We can provide the handouts on biosecurity at that time as well as how to enroll in the NPIP annual testing. We recommend that when you return home from these events that you isolate the birds for ~ 3 weeks and observe closely for signs of disease. Biosecurity at home after a show, is handling these birds last for feeding and clean up and having a foot bath and hand sanitation available going into and out of your quarantine coops. Don’t use common bowls, coops or tools without thorough disinfection.
     
  5. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    Quote:Thank you!
    I'm surprised that its free, I havn't done any research on this, so am unsure what the costs are here in WA state, but I expected it to be pricey....I thought a blood test, and the vet fee and the "paperwork" fee would really add up! I wonder if that is common in other states as well, for the certification to be free
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The purpose of the government NPIP program is to protect the food supply, not certify that backyard flocks are healthy. It does not test for the most common contagious chicken diseases, though if you pay extra, you can get a test for Mycoplasmosis every four months--some folks do. A huge misconception is that NPIP means your flock is completely healthy and disease free and that is not the case. It can give a false sense of security to buyer and chicken owner. That said, it is required for shipping birds AND eggs into almost every state.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Pullorum /typhoid and Mycoplasmosis can be transmitted through the hatching eggs or live chicks. Because of NPIP, Pullorum is not all that common anymore. It has not been wiped out, but it used to be a lot more common. Pollorum testing is a lot easier than Mycoplasmosis testing. That's probably why Mycoplasmosis is not part of NPIP.

    I do not participate in NPIP since I don't ship hatching eggs or chicks and I don't show my chickens. Best I can determine, testing is not free in Arkansas, but you can be licensed to perform your own tests and certify your own flock. Most countries require this testing before you can ship eggs or chicks to them. It's not just to protect our food supply but to allow export to other countries. That means jobs to Americans and a help to our balance of payments. I imagine that is why some of the testing is either free or not too expensive. They want to protect jobs created by interstate and overseas shipping.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Pullorum /typhoid and Mycoplasmosis can be transmitted through the hatching eggs or live chicks. Because of NPIP, Pullorum is not all that common anymore. It has not been wiped out, but it used to be a lot more common. Pollorum testing is a lot easier than Mycoplasmosis testing. That's probably why Mycoplasmosis is not part of NPIP.

    Agreed. Pullorum is all but wiped out in the United States, though on occasion, cases will crop up. If you don't sell eggs, chicks or show, it probably isn't worth the time/trouble/money, but certainly, you can do it if you like.​
     
  9. snooparis

    snooparis Out Of The Brooder

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    May 28, 2011
    any fancy chicken breeders here who can provide the requirements to export overseas? ex. health cert. by the state vet and certificate of pedigree(wingband or legbands)?
     

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