Nardole the Brave!

Dona Worry

Crowing
Jul 5, 2018
1,526
6,823
377
Vermont
Nardole the Brave is probably the best young cockerel I have ever met, with the possible exception of a rooster in my youth called King Louis.
Nardole is a Polish crested with a mild cross beak and a crooked tail, and no brains at all, but he tries.
He was supposed to be a pet for my cousin's children, and he was a great favorite called Blanche until he started crowing, but alas, my cousin lives in the middle of town and no roosters are permitted, so he went to live with cousin Dona, ie ME and I initially did not want him.
But the very first day I had him, I fell in love.
I knew nothing of quarantine, so I just chucked him in and hoped for the best. He was older than my pullets by quite a bit, and I was prepared for him to bully them and need to be removed. What I was not prepared for was just how seriously he would take his new job.
20180725_202752.jpg

20180615_123306.jpg

He would stand guard every second of every day. He would stand at the door when the girls were inside eating, and when they napped under the ladder, he would stand above them on the ramp and scan the skies.
20180709_085920.jpg

Once free ranging started, he learned to tidbit, and then it became his whole life. Catching bugs and calling his little flock over was what he did, when he wasn't busy watching for predators.
Which he did, with remarkable dedication, and almost unrealistic bravery.
There was one afternoon when I happened to glance out my window, and see all the chickens scatter into the bushes and overgrowth except for Nardole-- he was charging in the opposite direction, puffed up as much as his 5 month old body could fluff. Following his trajectory, I saw a fox galloping towards him!
I sent my dog out and ran outside in my house slippers. Nardole was in the Fox's mouth, but flapping and kicking for all he was worth! My dog saved the day, and my beautiful boy was wounded, but made a full recovery.
20180721_202710.jpg

I was astonished at both his bravery and overwhelming stupidity. He charged a fox, with no spurs, barely able to see.
He earned every bit of tlc that he recieved until his beak and eye healed.
The experience did not discourage him. If anything, it strengthened his resolve to be flock protector. Nothing was safe-- low flying airplanes were chased off the property, loud trucks on the road were threatened until they retreated, and no tractor was permitted to get passed him and into the yard. He perfected his alarm call, and the rest of the flock runs whenever he uses it.
He is always on guard.
20180820_072713.jpg

I brought home a feral hen with three new chicks, and Nardole was immediately interested. Despite keeping her at a distance in a smaller pen, he could always see her and was fascinated.
Then, when the flock was permitted to gather together and free range for the first time, he was immediately interested in the chicks-- talking to them softly, offering them crickets. He is SURE they are his own.
20180922_123035.jpg

I was worried he would attack them, and was prepared, once again, to intervene. Once again, he has defied my expectations in the most charming of ways.
He looks silly, with his huge crest in front of his eyes, with his crooked tail and funky beak. He is high maintenance, needing burrs removed and his beak trimmed.
20180909_112341.jpg

I wouldn't trade him for the world.
 

Melky

Spring has sprung!
Jul 23, 2018
3,975
19,157
892
Edgewood, KY
My Coop
Nardole the Brave is probably the best young cockerel I have ever met, with the possible exception of a rooster in my youth called King Louis.
Nardole is a Polish crested with a mild cross beak and a crooked tail, and no brains at all, but he tries.
He was supposed to be a pet for my cousin's children, and he was a great favorite called Blanche until he started crowing, but alas, my cousin lives in the middle of town and no roosters are permitted, so he went to live with cousin Dona, ie ME and I initially did not want him.
But the very first day I had him, I fell in love.
I knew nothing of quarantine, so I just chucked him in and hoped for the best. He was older than my pullets by quite a bit, and I was prepared for him to bully them and need to be removed. What I was not prepared for was just how seriously he would take his new job.
View attachment 1541747
View attachment 1541740
He would stand guard every second of every day. He would stand at the door when the girls were inside eating, and when they napped under the ladder, he would stand above them on the ramp and scan the skies.
View attachment 1541741
Once free ranging started, he learned to tidbit, and then it became his whole life. Catching bugs and calling his little flock over was what he did, when he wasn't busy watching for predators.
Which he did, with remarkable dedication, and almost unrealistic bravery.
There was one afternoon when I happened to glance out my window, and see all the chickens scatter into the bushes and overgrowth except for Nardole-- he was charging in the opposite direction, puffed up as much as his 5 month old body could fluff. Following his trajectory, I saw a fox galloping towards him!
I sent my dog out and ran outside in my house slippers. Nardole was in the Fox's mouth, but flapping and kicking for all he was worth! My dog saved the day, and my beautiful boy was wounded, but made a full recovery.
View attachment 1541743
I was astonished at both his bravery and overwhelming stupidity. He charged a fox, with no spurs, barely able to see.
He earned every bit of tlc that he recieved until his beak and eye healed.
The experience did not discourage him. If anything, it strengthened his resolve to be flock protector. Nothing was safe-- low flying airplanes were chased off the property, loud trucks on the road were threatened until they retreated, and no tractor was permitted to get passed him and into the yard. He perfected his alarm call, and the rest of the flock runs whenever he uses it.
He is always on guard.
View attachment 1541745
I brought home a feral hen with three new chicks, and Nardole was immediately interested. Despite keeping her at a distance in a smaller pen, he could always see her and was fascinated.
Then, when the flock was permitted to gather together and free range for the first time, he was immediately interested in the chicks-- talking to them softly, offering them crickets. He is SURE they are his own.
View attachment 1541746
I was worried he would attack them, and was prepared, once again, to intervene. Once again, he has defied my expectations in the most charming of ways.
He looks silly, with his huge crest in front of his eyes, with his crooked tail and funky beak. He is high maintenance, needing burrs removed and his beak trimmed.
View attachment 1541742
I wouldn't trade him for the world.
This is a touching story! :)
 

Dona Worry

Crowing
Jul 5, 2018
1,526
6,823
377
Vermont
What an endearing little guy and a terrific story! Thank you so much for sharing the story and all those wonderful pictures. May my cockerel, Fabio be as wonderful as your Nardole the Brave.
I keep waiting for him to get rough with the pullets or human aggressive, but nope, he is good as gold.
If he us a representative of all Polish crested, I'll never have another breed of rooster.
 

Dona Worry

Crowing
Jul 5, 2018
1,526
6,823
377
Vermont
Everyone hopes for a rooster half as good as Nardole...you really lucked out!
My other cockerel is turning out to be a bit of a jerk, but Nardole is my unexpected diamond in the rough. He looks wacky, has the most horrible crow, terrible conformation, but the BEST personality.
If I ever did hatch my own eggs I'd keep a male from any cross that had him in it.
 

WhoDatChick

Enabler
Sep 6, 2018
6,386
38,709
1,027
Nawlins, Louisiana
Nardole the Brave is probably the best young cockerel I have ever met, with the possible exception of a rooster in my youth called King Louis.
Nardole is a Polish crested with a mild cross beak and a crooked tail, and no brains at all, but he tries.
He was supposed to be a pet for my cousin's children, and he was a great favorite called Blanche until he started crowing, but alas, my cousin lives in the middle of town and no roosters are permitted, so he went to live with cousin Dona, ie ME and I initially did not want him.
But the very first day I had him, I fell in love.
I knew nothing of quarantine, so I just chucked him in and hoped for the best. He was older than my pullets by quite a bit, and I was prepared for him to bully them and need to be removed. What I was not prepared for was just how seriously he would take his new job.
View attachment 1541747
View attachment 1541740
He would stand guard every second of every day. He would stand at the door when the girls were inside eating, and when they napped under the ladder, he would stand above them on the ramp and scan the skies.
View attachment 1541741
Once free ranging started, he learned to tidbit, and then it became his whole life. Catching bugs and calling his little flock over was what he did, when he wasn't busy watching for predators.
Which he did, with remarkable dedication, and almost unrealistic bravery.
There was one afternoon when I happened to glance out my window, and see all the chickens scatter into the bushes and overgrowth except for Nardole-- he was charging in the opposite direction, puffed up as much as his 5 month old body could fluff. Following his trajectory, I saw a fox galloping towards him!
I sent my dog out and ran outside in my house slippers. Nardole was in the Fox's mouth, but flapping and kicking for all he was worth! My dog saved the day, and my beautiful boy was wounded, but made a full recovery.
View attachment 1541743
I was astonished at both his bravery and overwhelming stupidity. He charged a fox, with no spurs, barely able to see.
He earned every bit of tlc that he recieved until his beak and eye healed.
The experience did not discourage him. If anything, it strengthened his resolve to be flock protector. Nothing was safe-- low flying airplanes were chased off the property, loud trucks on the road were threatened until they retreated, and no tractor was permitted to get passed him and into the yard. He perfected his alarm call, and the rest of the flock runs whenever he uses it.
He is always on guard.
View attachment 1541745
I brought home a feral hen with three new chicks, and Nardole was immediately interested. Despite keeping her at a distance in a smaller pen, he could always see her and was fascinated.
Then, when the flock was permitted to gather together and free range for the first time, he was immediately interested in the chicks-- talking to them softly, offering them crickets. He is SURE they are his own.
View attachment 1541746
I was worried he would attack them, and was prepared, once again, to intervene. Once again, he has defied my expectations in the most charming of ways.
He looks silly, with his huge crest in front of his eyes, with his crooked tail and funky beak. He is high maintenance, needing burrs removed and his beak trimmed.
View attachment 1541742
I wouldn't trade him for the world.
Now I want a rooster :D... he is too cute!!
 

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