Narragansett Turkey with possible infected wattle?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by meseckk, Aug 3, 2014.

  1. meseckk

    meseckk New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2014
    I have 3 Narragansett turkeys-2 toms and a hen. Last month the toms had a day of all out warfare-fighting holding onto one another's beaks and wattles. Now one of the tom's has a wattle that is swollen, hot and obviously bothering him...I had not been too concerned about it until my daughter noticed that he will no longer even strut. Does anyone have any experience with this or suggestions on what to do? She managed to catch him (my birds free range during the day) so we were able to get a good look but I don't know what to DO with it?
     
  2. meseckk

    meseckk New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2014
    I took some pictures to give you an idea of what it looks like...[​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  3. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Separate the fellow out. Could be the infection is systemic. Please read through this thread (wound treatment):

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/203024/cat-attack-hen-skin-ripped-pic-graphic-help-please

    And I'd probably run a course of Pen-G injectable: https://sites.google.com/a/poultryp...oultry-podiatry#chickens_penicillin_injection

    If you can't get a nonstick dressing to stay in place, once the wound is cleaned/disinfected, we've had good luck with some pretty deep lacerations (one dog attack/one hen cut by tom's claw during breeding) with Durvet's Red Oil wound spray, applied twice a day.
    If the Penicillin is effective, the wound itself could take around 2-4 weeks to heal completely. Keep the guy penned separately until he is healed.

    If the wound is kept clean and infection is beaten, the dead tissue should slough away as healing progresses - though it might require debridement if the discolored areas at the margins expand (check wound for bad odor).

    When our toms were young and sparring more than not, we resorted to the somewhat messy Pine Tar & Neosporin mix. A gob of pine tar in a med cup - heated in microwave for ~7-10 seconds (softens it up) - add in another gob of neosporin and stir up -paint this on the heads and necks of toms with latex gloved hands. Toms bite - the taste is terrible - but the pine tar is a topical `disinfectant' & the neosporin a topical antibiotic - no flies/no infections - not as wild about the biting portion of sparring.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  4. meseckk

    meseckk New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2014
    I've been raising birds for about 6 years now and have NEVER had to get any type of medication for them...where would I get Pen-G??? THe other birds aren't bothering him and he's a big guy so I'm not sure where I could isolate him but I'm sure that between my daughter and I we could figure out some way to put a bandage over it to stop him from worrying it so much. Thanks for your input. My fiancé was wanting to put him down because he's afraid the bird is suffering but I'm hoping to try to treat it first!
    Kristina
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Feed Store/Tractor Supply are good sources of meds/syringes. We've had toms sparring, seasonally, for nine years and have seen some nasty abrasions/lacerations/swollen snoods/injured eyes with `lids' `fused' together (a month before opening - even with antibiotic eye ointment. All have healed up with minimal interventions.

    The wound on your tom almost looks like an infected/picked at spider bite. If nothing else, try the Durvet antiseptic/antibiotic spray for a few weeks (though a systemic antibiotic is probably best).
    Telfa pad over wound - wrap around with surg tape (somewhat loosely)..

    From photos/description, alone - I'd think he has a good chance (though labor intensive - once a day).
     
  6. meseckk

    meseckk New Egg

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    Aug 3, 2014
    Thanks so MUCH!!!
     

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