Natural Breeding Heritage Quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Hils Half Acre, Dec 4, 2014.

  1. Hils Half Acre

    Hils Half Acre Out Of The Brooder

    I am new to this and I have a feeling I don't know the right lingo to search with, if there is already an answer to my questions on the forum please feel free to direct me that way.

    First, I would like to raise a heritage breed quail but I'm not sure what breed(s) that may be. Any suggestions there?

    Second, I would like the quail hens to naturally brood their own babies, I don't want to have to pay for and deal with an incubator if there is a way around it, I want to build my flock as naturally as possible.

    Thank you!
     
  2. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Technically, there is no definition of heritage quail....But if there was, more than likely coturnix and some bobwhite wouldnt be heritage because all coturnix and some bobwhite (except northern, masked, crested etc..) have been selectively bred for meat and egg production so any new world quail, except certain bobwhites, so go with Northern bobwhite, California Valley, Mountain, Blue Scaled etc... Your only trouble is that you will have a hard time getting them to brood their own eggs and chicks. Your best bet is using a chicken, pigeon, or pheasant to do it. But chickens can spread disease to gamebirds. Your best bet would be a pheasant.
     
  3. Hils Half Acre

    Hils Half Acre Out Of The Brooder

    Thanks a lot! I hadn't thought of using a pheasant! I think I will definitely give that a shot.
     
  4. Ntsees

    Ntsees Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Regarding your second question, if you get the new world quail species, it'll probably be a hit or miss if the hen will sit on her eggs - which you'll need to provide them a large and well planted aviary so they will feel comfortable. They will need to be in pairs - one pair per aviary. Anymore than that and there will be conflict. As far as using a pheasant to incubate the quail eggs, what kind of pheasant did you have in mind? A ring-neck pheasant is too large for quail eggs. And if you did find a suitable pheasant (or other bird) to sit, the timing will need to be correct - i.e. the pheasant is broody right at the time when you have enough quail eggs to be set. Just some things for you to think about, because I will be in a similar situation come spring time.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2014
  5. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Absolutely, Need a well planted aviary with lots of hiding/nesting spots. And yes, lighter pheasant. Although I dont think timing is a huge concern, I have had birds hatch different species. One hatched out eggs that took 14 days longer than her own eggs, and she didnt mind whatsoever. But yes, quail eggs are fragile and need a careful mother.And having the new world species in pairs is pretty important as well, you could have alot of blood on your hands if you dont, or have plenty of room for them to hide
     
  6. Ntsees

    Ntsees Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, my birds don't mind either if the eggs took a little longer than if she was hatching her own eggs. As for timing, I probably didn't explain it clear. What I meant by the timing is that you can't make a pheasant hen sit on eggs that you have ready until she becomes broody herself. If the pheasant hen and the quail hen starts laying eggs at about the same time, by the time the pheasant hen has finished laying and has become broody, you should have enough quail eggs to slip under her. Any quail eggs laid too early (therefore too old at incubation) or after the pheasant hen incubates will not hatch with the clutch (eggs laid after hen incubation and slipped under can be started by the hen but an incubator will have to finish the job due to hatching later).
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
  7. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    oh gotcha, yes, that is very important, you definitely want to know thatt she is going to become broody first before you ever think about gathering eggs
     

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