Natural Easter Egg Dyes

Hinotori

Silver Feathers
Premium member
8 Years
Apr 27, 2011
5,314
2,912
426
Graham, WA
Decided I was finally going to try natural dyes for eggs this year. Natural dyes can be scratched off if not careful until fully dried. I put a coffee filter on bottom of bowls I used for dying so that their wasn't a white spot where the egg sat on bottom.

I do not have any white layers so all color is over the base blue eggs from my ameraucana.
20190414_233603.jpg




I used four different items to dye the eggs and got five colors.

ETA: wash the bloom off eggs before trying to dye them.

From left to right - cooked in yellow onion skin, dyed in onion skin dye, turmeric, beet, red cabbage. All dyes, but tumeric, have 1 tablespoon of vinegar added per cup of water.

20190414_140307.jpg



For the yellow onion skin color of red/brown you start with raw eggs unlike the others. I layed down a layer of onion skin then wrapped onion skin around and between them then I filled the pot with more. I filled to cover with water and added the vinegar. Cooked for 20 minutes as instructions I found said to.

For the orange color, I strained the liquid from the onion skins and put hard cooked eggs in it for 10 minutes.

Turmeric is 1 tablespoon per cup of water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Do not strain. Put hard cooked egg in while watching carefully. Pull when desired color is achieved. Only a minute or so is needed. Soaking egg in vinegar for a few moments after will brighten the yellow if it's turned too mustard brown.

The pinkish red from the beets turned out a bit splotchy. Just a warning that it seemed to bubble in spots on the eggs. I cubed 2 cups of beets and covered 2.5 cups of water. Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer about 45 minutes. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for about an hour. Turn occasionally to help even the color.

The deep blue is from red cabbage. I simmered 2 cups of shredded red cabbage in 2.5 cups of water for 1 hour. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for 2 - 2.5 hours. Turn occasionally to help even dying.


I cooked one of my olive eggs just to see what color it could turn out. I was very happy with it.

Original egg look
20190414_140124.jpg


After cabbage dye
20190414_140203.jpg



My pretty egg basket
20190414_140351.jpg
 
Last edited:

Hinotori

Silver Feathers
Premium member
8 Years
Apr 27, 2011
5,314
2,912
426
Graham, WA
Beautiful! I write pysanky, and I've done them on both white and brown eggs. I'm looking forward to next Lent, and hopefully having Easter Egger blue or green eggs to try them on. I use the aniline dyes, haven't tried natural dyes yet.
View attachment 1738902
Those are beautiful
 

SurferchickinSB

Crowing
Feb 23, 2018
2,177
3,471
432
California
Decided I was finally going to try natural dyes for eggs this year. Natural dyes can be scratched off if not careful until fully dried. I put a coffee filter on bottom of bowls I used for dying so that their wasn't a white spot where the egg sat on bottom.

I do not have any white layers so all color is over the base blue eggs from my ameraucana.
View attachment 1738878



I used four different items to dye the eggs and got five colors.

ETA: wash the bloom off eggs before trying to dye them.

From left to right - cooked in yellow onion skin, dyed in onion skin dye, turmeric, beet, red cabbage. All dyes, but tumeric, have 1 tablespoon of vinegar added per cup of water.

View attachment 1738877


For the yellow onion skin color of red/brown you start with raw eggs unlike the others. I layed down a layer of onion skin then wrapped onion skin around and between them then I filled the pot with more. I filled to cover with water and added the vinegar. Cooked for 20 minutes as instructions I found said to.

For the orange color, I strained the liquid from the onion skins and put hard cooked eggs in it for 10 minutes.

Turmeric is 1 tablespoon per cup of water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Do not strain. Put hard cooked egg in while watching carefully. Pull when desired color is achieved. Only a minute or so is needed. Soaking egg in vinegar for a few moments after will brighten the yellow if it's turned too mustard brown.

The pinkish red from the beets turned out a bit splotchy. Just a warning that it seemed to bubble in spots on the eggs. I cubed 2 cups of beets and covered 2.5 cups of water. Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer about 45 minutes. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for about an hour. Turn occasionally to help even the color.

The deep blue is from red cabbage. I simmered 2 cups of shredded red cabbage in 2.5 cups of water for 1 hour. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for 2 - 2.5 hours. Turn occasionally to help even dying.


I cooked one of my olive eggs just to see what color it could turn out. I was very happy with it.

Original egg look
View attachment 1738879

After cabbage dye
View attachment 1738880


My pretty egg basket
View attachment 1738881
How beautiful!
 

NewChickenmama06

Songster
Apr 5, 2019
147
389
147
Western Ma
Decided I was finally going to try natural dyes for eggs this year. Natural dyes can be scratched off if not careful until fully dried. I put a coffee filter on bottom of bowls I used for dying so that their wasn't a white spot where the egg sat on bottom.

I do not have any white layers so all color is over the base blue eggs from my ameraucana.
View attachment 1738878



I used four different items to dye the eggs and got five colors.

ETA: wash the bloom off eggs before trying to dye them.

From left to right - cooked in yellow onion skin, dyed in onion skin dye, turmeric, beet, red cabbage. All dyes, but tumeric, have 1 tablespoon of vinegar added per cup of water.

View attachment 1738877


For the yellow onion skin color of red/brown you start with raw eggs unlike the others. I layed down a layer of onion skin then wrapped onion skin around and between them then I filled the pot with more. I filled to cover with water and added the vinegar. Cooked for 20 minutes as instructions I found said to.

For the orange color, I strained the liquid from the onion skins and put hard cooked eggs in it for 10 minutes.

Turmeric is 1 tablespoon per cup of water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Do not strain. Put hard cooked egg in while watching carefully. Pull when desired color is achieved. Only a minute or so is needed. Soaking egg in vinegar for a few moments after will brighten the yellow if it's turned too mustard brown.

The pinkish red from the beets turned out a bit splotchy. Just a warning that it seemed to bubble in spots on the eggs. I cubed 2 cups of beets and covered 2.5 cups of water. Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer about 45 minutes. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for about an hour. Turn occasionally to help even the color.

The deep blue is from red cabbage. I simmered 2 cups of shredded red cabbage in 2.5 cups of water for 1 hour. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for 2 - 2.5 hours. Turn occasionally to help even dying.


I cooked one of my olive eggs just to see what color it could turn out. I was very happy with it.

Original egg look
View attachment 1738879

After cabbage dye
View attachment 1738880


My pretty egg basket
View attachment 1738881
Decided I was finally going to try natural dyes for eggs this year. Natural dyes can be scratched off if not careful until fully dried. I put a coffee filter on bottom of bowls I used for dying so that their wasn't a white spot where the egg sat on bottom.

I do not have any white layers so all color is over the base blue eggs from my ameraucana.
View attachment 1738878



I used four different items to dye the eggs and got five colors.

ETA: wash the bloom off eggs before trying to dye them.

From left to right - cooked in yellow onion skin, dyed in onion skin dye, turmeric, beet, red cabbage. All dyes, but tumeric, have 1 tablespoon of vinegar added per cup of water.

View attachment 1738877


For the yellow onion skin color of red/brown you start with raw eggs unlike the others. I layed down a layer of onion skin then wrapped onion skin around and between them then I filled the pot with more. I filled to cover with water and added the vinegar. Cooked for 20 minutes as instructions I found said to.

For the orange color, I strained the liquid from the onion skins and put hard cooked eggs in it for 10 minutes.

Turmeric is 1 tablespoon per cup of water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Do not strain. Put hard cooked egg in while watching carefully. Pull when desired color is achieved. Only a minute or so is needed. Soaking egg in vinegar for a few moments after will brighten the yellow if it's turned too mustard brown.

The pinkish red from the beets turned out a bit splotchy. Just a warning that it seemed to bubble in spots on the eggs. I cubed 2 cups of beets and covered 2.5 cups of water. Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer about 45 minutes. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for about an hour. Turn occasionally to help even the color.

The deep blue is from red cabbage. I simmered 2 cups of shredded red cabbage in 2.5 cups of water for 1 hour. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for 2 - 2.5 hours. Turn occasionally to help even dying.


I cooked one of my olive eggs just to see what color it could turn out. I was very happy with it.

Original egg look
View attachment 1738879

After cabbage dye
View attachment 1738880


My pretty egg basket
View attachment 1738881
Thanks for this awesome information. My daughter can't have artificial dye's and I have been looking to use a natural alternative.:goodpost:
 
Last edited:

N F C

yep, still winter
Staff member
Premium member
6 Years
Dec 12, 2013
69,760
206,071
2,012
Wyoming
Decided I was finally going to try natural dyes for eggs this year. Natural dyes can be scratched off if not careful until fully dried. I put a coffee filter on bottom of bowls I used for dying so that their wasn't a white spot where the egg sat on bottom.

I do not have any white layers so all color is over the base blue eggs from my ameraucana.
View attachment 1738878



I used four different items to dye the eggs and got five colors.

ETA: wash the bloom off eggs before trying to dye them.

From left to right - cooked in yellow onion skin, dyed in onion skin dye, turmeric, beet, red cabbage. All dyes, but tumeric, have 1 tablespoon of vinegar added per cup of water.

View attachment 1738877


For the yellow onion skin color of red/brown you start with raw eggs unlike the others. I layed down a layer of onion skin then wrapped onion skin around and between them then I filled the pot with more. I filled to cover with water and added the vinegar. Cooked for 20 minutes as instructions I found said to.

For the orange color, I strained the liquid from the onion skins and put hard cooked eggs in it for 10 minutes.

Turmeric is 1 tablespoon per cup of water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Do not strain. Put hard cooked egg in while watching carefully. Pull when desired color is achieved. Only a minute or so is needed. Soaking egg in vinegar for a few moments after will brighten the yellow if it's turned too mustard brown.

The pinkish red from the beets turned out a bit splotchy. Just a warning that it seemed to bubble in spots on the eggs. I cubed 2 cups of beets and covered 2.5 cups of water. Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer about 45 minutes. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for about an hour. Turn occasionally to help even the color.

The deep blue is from red cabbage. I simmered 2 cups of shredded red cabbage in 2.5 cups of water for 1 hour. Strain. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar per cup of liquid. Soak eggs for 2 - 2.5 hours. Turn occasionally to help even dying.


I cooked one of my olive eggs just to see what color it could turn out. I was very happy with it.

Original egg look
View attachment 1738879

After cabbage dye
View attachment 1738880


My pretty egg basket
View attachment 1738881
Those turned out great! You should write this up as an article, bet others would enjoy seeing it :)
 

Hinotori

Silver Feathers
Premium member
8 Years
Apr 27, 2011
5,314
2,912
426
Graham, WA
After I posted the egg basket picture on Facebook, I was told that hibiscus flowers make an almost black dye. I have plenty of dried ones because I like hibiscus tea and had also tried it for fabric dying. (Turns out light grey and not lightfast).

So 3 cups of water and one cup of dried hibiscus flowers. I simmered 30 minutes then strained. Came up with 2 cups dye. I added 2 tablespoons vinegar and put the eggs in for 2 hours, turning occasionally. It has a tendency to splotchy like the beet. Very careful handling to remove from bath. Color will change and darken as it dries.

20190416_151520.jpg
 
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