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Necessary light for layers

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by beverley7, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. beverley7

    beverley7 Out Of The Brooder

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    Can you please tell me how much light per day layers need? Mine actually haven't started to lay yet but as the days are getting shorter and they are due to lay soon, I wanted to give them the best opportunity.
    Thanks for any responses.
     
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Quote:Most often recommended is: 14 hours of light. If you supplement do so in the morning, so they can go to bed naturally.

    But there is a lot of different options. It's up to you.

    Imp
     
  3. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Enumclaw
    Quote:Most often recommended is: 14 hours of light. If you supplement do so in the morning, so they can go to bed naturally.

    But there is a lot of different options. It's up to you.

    Imp

    X2
     
  4. gmachicken

    gmachicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 18, 2010
    Grants Pass, OR
    Thanks for asking Beverley7. My question as well. We have a 10 X 10 open coop. Our weather gets fairly cool. I understand that that is not necessarily a problem. Last year we had 2 red bulbs and one heat lamp in there. Was that to much or not enough. They were on 24 7. It wasn't really bright light.

    So if they need only 14 hours is it bright light? or red heat type light. With 18 hens and pullets how much is needed. They all fit on the roost.
    I hope the questions are clear.[​IMG]
     
  5. NevadaRon

    NevadaRon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dayton
    According to Storey's [​IMG], chicken eyes are more sensitive to light at the red end of the spectrum. So using a red bulb is more efficient - a 40 watt red bulb will have more effect than a 40 watt plain white bulb - i.e., it will appear brighter to the chickens. [​IMG]
     
  6. 3chimama

    3chimama Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 8, 2010
    Pacific Northwest
    I have always believed 12 hours of light....
     
  7. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    My coop light goes on at 6PM and off at 8PM.

    It's always worked for me.
     
  8. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Where are you located? It is slightly different depending where you are according to latitude. I know that in Washington State that I will need a bit more light than say Mahonri. Mahonri lives much further south than I do. I have less light during the winter months, than some one living in the SW of the USA. I also have more light than someone that lives in Alaska. So the trick is to figure out how much you need to supplement. The 14 hours of daylight seems to be standard, 12 hours may work for some people,but there isn't the guarantee that the birds will continue to lay with that few of hours.
     
  9. arch_cpj

    arch_cpj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    we have always set up our timer to go on at 530 and off at 930 as in Ohio in winter it is dark by 515 many days It is OK to give up to 16 hours of light and I aim for 14... I use a compact flouresent light works and cheap to run...
     
  10. tuesdays chicks

    tuesdays chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 26, 2010
    stuart florida
    Is adding light considered forced laying, I see where mahori would need to do it because of the heat in summer and the lack of eggs then. But is forced laying bad for the hen ,do they lay as long. I would like the eggs in winter but want them to lay for as many years as possible.
     

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