Neck Injury

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by naturegirlmn, Apr 1, 2019.

  1. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    This morning I found one or our hens hiding and holding her head very oddly. I think it is wry neck from what I have read. We feed them almost exclusively layer pellets, so I don't understand it being a lack of a vitamin, but we did switch companies a couple of months ago. We have a couple of roosters, though that are crazy this spring. Could it be from a rooster trying to grab her? She is a Red Ranger and our friendliest one well loved hen. :(

    I have black oil sunflower seeds that I could give her. Should I? She has been moved away from the flock and has her own water and food.
     
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  2. staceyj

    staceyj Enabler

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    If you post some pictures or a short video of how she holding her head it may be helpful to people who are well acquainted with wryneck.
    *videos have to be linked via you-tube or similar third party viewing platform.

    Photos are super easy, especially if you are working with a smart phone.
     
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  3. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    Okay, I will do that.
     
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  4. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    IMG_20190401_164251305.jpg IMG_20190401_164320582.jpg IMG_20190401_164254702.jpg IMG_20190401_164251305.jpg IMG_20190401_164320582.jpg IMG_20190401_164254702.jpg
     
  5. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    Whoops, somehow doubled the photos. I am not sure how to do the videos. I took some. She eats and drinks. Is it okay for her to be drinking? She has her head more upside down than upright most of the time. She drinks sideways then tries to get her head upright to swallow. She can get her head upright, but doesn't often. It was a very rough winter here.

    She started losing some feathers on her head awhile ago, then on her back. The head and neck feathers are coming back in nicely, so I figured she was molting...at a terrible time of year. The back feathers now look like a rooster issue, which we are working on remedying. We have another hen that has lost a lot of feathers. We had a hen hatch out a bunch of roosters which evidently are coming if age. Most of them are locked in a different pen and will be leaving.

    Could mites be involved? We have never had them except leg mites, which are a constant battle. She doesn't have those. Hopefully spring will show up soon and we can clean the winter pens are really good.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Poor hen. Yes that is wry neck or torticolis. It is a symptom, and can be seen with a head or neck injury, a vitamin E or B1 (thiamine) deficiency, and may be seen with some diseases including Mareks disease. It also can be seen in some rather serious respiratory diseases and fowl cholera. Some chickens have a hereditary tendency to it. Can you include your location, since that can help with advice?

    It can be wild with young cockerels becoming mature, and the poor hens should be spared. I would treat with special feeding 3 times a day, and give her vitamin E 400 IU daily, plus some form of thiamine (B1.) Many use vitamin B complex tablets, and give 1/4 tablet crushed into some cooked egg which contains selenium. Mix a mash of chicken feed with a lot of water, plus a little egg in a small bowl. If she fights, you can wrap her in a towel, and feed her on your lap. Offer extra water. Hopefully, she will get well soon. Wry neck may take days to weeks to improve, if it improves.
     
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  7. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    We are located in rural Minnesota. It has been a really rough winter, despite several heatlamps, we lost several hens, our last guinea and our little Japanese roo. All seemed to be different circumstances. Some were many years old. It has been an emotional winter to say the least. With all the snow there is no way to clean the pens out well yet either.

    So it is safe for her to drink water? I see she was eating, too. Her weight seems to be better than it was earlier this winter. She is a Red Ranger, named Ranger and food is very important to her. . Look out anyone in between her and the food tray when I am filling it!

    Could mites be an issue? The feather loss, etc and now a possible vitamin deficiency. I do not know anything about them, but read they can be an issue in our cold climate.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Oh yes it is safe for her to drink water and eat, or whatever she feels like doing. Stress can add to wry neck, so use your own judgement as to whether or not to separate her. If any seem to bully her, take her out. But I would separate the roosters. Mites can be seen on the skin crawling around the vent or under wings, but one type of mite only comes out at night. You may find them in hiding places under roosts or in seems of the walls. Permethrin dust or spray are very good for treatment. Some use ivermectin pour on or injectable, used topically.
     
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  9. naturegirlmn

    naturegirlmn Chirping

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    Would nutritional yeast work for the B1? I don't have any E or B1 , but can see if my husband can pick some up. I am concerned about something physically happening to her if left with the main group.
     
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  10. staceyj

    staceyj Enabler

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    I’ll leave the treatment plan to @Eggcessive , but I’d like to add that when is molting as yours appears to be doing, they can often act and feel “under the weather” and at a time when their bodies are in dire need of protein to grow all their new feathers, some seem to have a decreased appetite.
    This can cause a deficiency to rear its head.
    Vitamin e gel caps and the B complex vitamins are the easiest and fastest way to get a therapeutic dose of these essentials into her and can be found at any grocery store, drug store, Walmart or similar. For the vitamin e, just pinch the gelatin capsule and squeeze the liquid directly into her food.

    In my opinion the severity of her symptoms suggests that you treat it aggressively starting ASAP.

    Providing her feed as mash (just feed wetted down with warm water into an oatmeal or porridge consistency) is an easy way to get fluids into her.

    I’d definitely look her over closely for evidence of parasites and look at the legs of all your others as well because from your photos it appears that she might be battling scaly leg mites in addition to her other troubles.

    Treating for lice/mites includes treating the whole flock, coop cleaning and spraying down the interior.
    When you get to that when your weather breaks , don’t forget to spray/wipe down the roosts and nesting boxes since that’s a common highway for them.

    A good product that is simple to use is any fly spray meant for horses such as this as long as it’s active ingredient is a pyrethrin.
    61F92A42-1043-478B-B277-32B24F4687AB.jpeg

    It is easy to spritz it on the birds (2 sprays under wings, tummy, back, neck and vent).
    Or either of these : this one is highly concentrated and need to be diluted in a spray bottle:
    CB5EB167-BC08-44A1-99CA-ABC71C0F0243.jpeg 56596963-2EA9-4DE2-99ED-A99E47B02BAA.jpeg
     
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