necrotic smelling nasal discharge

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Milliestwo, May 14, 2009.

  1. Milliestwo

    Milliestwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2008
    [​IMG]

    I am not sure what is going on,I have two bantam blackpolish/white crested.They have been fine and are about three months old now,they are eating well and playing with each other and coming to me for petting and when I picked one of them up one day about a week or so I smelled a necrotic type smell and started looking for maybe a wound from rough play,but what i found was a nasal discharge that smelled like something was rotten.
    It isn't a runny discharge but dark and thick,they do not sneeze or act sick in anyway.
    I started them on Sulmet about four days ago and haven't seen much improvement but some.
    So does anyone out there have an idea what it might be? I love these two girls they want to be with people all the time and will stand for you to pet them.
    Any help anyone can give will be apprecieated
    Linda
     
  2. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    How long have you had them and where did they come from? Also, do they by any chance have bubbly eyes?
     
  3. ISOLATE THEM. Look one this site for nasal discharge and bad smell.

    you MAY have a disease that is not such a good thing to have.

    Remember though, chickens can and DO smell pretty bad when they are allowed to "free range"

    They get into poop and dirt and rotten things to get their snacks.

    I believe the diesease MAY be Coryza.
     
  4. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    That's what I am afraid of too.
    The following is from msucares.com:
    Infectious Coryza
    Infectious coryza is a specific respiratory disease in chickens that occurs most often in semi-mature or adult birds. Infection may result in a slow-spreading, chronic disease that affects only a small number of birds at one time, or in a rapid spreading disease with a higher percentage of birds being affected. The occurrence of infectious coryza is not widespread and the incidence is relatively low.

    The disease is caused by a bacterium known as Hemophilus gallinarum. Outbreaks usually result from the introduction of infected or carrier birds into a flock. Transmission of the infection occurs by direct contact, airborne infection by dust or respiratory discharge droplets and drinking water contaminated by infective nasal exudate. Susceptible birds usually develop symptoms within three days after exposure to the disease. Recovered individuals may appear normal but remain carriers of the organism for long periods. Once a flock is infected, all birds must be considered as carriers.

    The most characteristic symptoms of infectious coryza include edematous swelling of the face around the eyes and wattles, nasal discharge and swollen sinuses. Watery discharge from the eyes frequently results in the lids adhering together. Vision may be affected because of the swelling. The disease results in a decrease in feed and water consumption and an increase in the number of cull birds. An adverse effect on egg production usually occurs in proportion to the number of affected birds.

    Diagnosis can be confirmed only by isolation and identification of the causative organism. The organism, Hemophilus gallinarum, is extremely fastidious and often difficult to isolate.

    Prevention is the only sound approach in controlling infectious coryza. It usually can be prevented by management programs that eliminate contact between susceptible and infected birds. It requires only separating affected or carrier birds from the susceptible population. In order to prevent the infection, introduce started or adult birds only from sources known to be free of the infection. If infection occurs, complete depopulation followed by thorough cleaning/disinfecting is the only means for eliminating the disease.

    A number of drugs are effective for treating the symptoms of the disease although the disease is never completely eliminated. Sulfadimethoxine or sulfathiazole in the feed or water or erythromycin administered in the drinking water can reduce the symptoms of this disease.
     
  5. Milliestwo

    Milliestwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2008
    I have had them since the 18th of April and I got them from a local that breeds and sells many types of chickens and have not heard of any problems that they have had. I had them in isolation up until last week and put them in with two other young birds. They do not have bubbly eyes at all just the nasal smell.

    The other birds are fine no discharge or smell at all just the two Polish.
    I have been giving Sulmet everyday since Monday and i will do that for a total of 5 days,they are still very active and chattering and eating like a house on fire, I think they aren't polish chickens at all but little feathery PIGS,they eat all the time.[​IMG]

    I am also medicating all of my other birds that are in the same area as the polish and none of them have shown any signs of anything.
    Hope the Sulmet works I have been told that it is real good for a lot of different thins.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    If it is Coryza, they may seem to recover, but will be carriers for the rest of their lives. Just want you to be aware of that fact.
     
  7. Milliestwo

    Milliestwo Out Of The Brooder

    35
    0
    32
    Sep 22, 2008
    I have had them since the 18th of April and I got them from a local that breeds and sells many types of chickens and have not heard of any problems that they have had. I had them in isolation up until last week and put them in with two other young birds. They do not have bubbly eyes at all just the nasal smell.

    The other birds are fine no discharge or smell at all just the two Polish.
    I have been giving Sulmet everyday since Monday and i will do that for a total of 5 days,they are still very active and chattering and eating like a house on fire, I think they aren't polish chickens at all but little feathery PIGS,they eat all the time.[​IMG]

    I am also medicating all of my other birds that are in the same area as the polish and none of them have shown any signs of anything.
    Hope the Sulmet works I have been told that it is real good for a lot of different things.
    Also these chickens do not free range ,WAY to many Hawks for that and I have already lost three before we made changes to the coop area.
     
  8. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    If it is Coruza you will soon know it because your younger chicks will have it too. You cannot get rid of Coryza unless you cull the birds and sanitize your whole place.
     

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