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Need a little help. Is this molting, picking, mites, or an over agressive rooster? Thanks!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Slawdog, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. Slawdog

    Slawdog New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2011
    [​IMG]In case it matters, I've got 1 rooster & 9 hens.[​IMG]
     
  2. Yoke

    Yoke Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2012
    Are those new baby feathers or remains of the old feathers?
     
  3. EmAbTo48

    EmAbTo48 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 9, 2011
    Northern Wisconsin
    that honestly looks like mites you usually can see the eggs on the skin eek! But maybe I am wrong.
     
  4. Slawdog

    Slawdog New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2011
    I'm not sure. How long does it take new feathers to grow? The white rock has looked this way for over a few months now. I initially thought moulting, but the longer it's gone on I'm not sure. I've got 1-2 other hens that are missing the same or less feathers as Golden comet in the pic. The white rock just looks way worse than them. All the other girls look fine. No feathers missing at all.
     
  5. LestersFlat

    LestersFlat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2011
    Schuyler Lake NY
    I had the same problem with just one hen, but I actually caught another of the hens pecking at her feathers. In my case, I think it was because they were locked up for the winter in their coop, after having been free range before that. They were bored. It took about 3 weeks separated from the others in the chicken hospital (my garage) for her feathers to come back enough where I thought she could withstand the cold temps and go back with the others.

    If you can pick up these hens and check them for mites, I'd say that's a good starting point. You can either rule them out as a possibility, or treat those affected.
     

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