Need advise ASAP!!! Losing a guinea a night to something!

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by happyhippiechik, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. happyhippiechik

    happyhippiechik Out Of The Brooder

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    We have something taking out our guineas, one each night. I have a trap set below the tree they roost in, but have not caught anything. They always roost in the same tree so I'm wondering if removing that tree would force them to another roosting area, and thus, hopefully spare the few that are left. They refuse to go into any sort of shelter even tho they were originally trained to do so. All we find are feathers under the tree, and once a few pieces that looked like intestines. I'm horrified to go out every morning for fear what I'll find. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks!
    Christine
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Do not feed them outside. Get them hungry, then put feed in the coop and lock them up. Whatever is killing them (very possibly a Great Horned Owl) will continue as long as they are outside. Good luck at securing them.
     
  3. happyhippiechik

    happyhippiechik Out Of The Brooder

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    That's a great idea, however, we have a fenced pasture for our hens and even if I don't feed the guineas, they go into the pasture and help themselves to what is scattered for the chickens. I'm thinking I'll have the tree cut down and hope they move to a different area.
    Thank you for your response!
    Christine
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Whatever the predator, it will locate them and continue killing. Once a predator locates a food source, it stays in the area feeding until the source has been depleted. I once had a large free ranging flock of semi feral bantams. They roosted in the white pines behind my house. A pair of owls started killing them, and they moved into the shrubbery up against the house. The owls continued killing them until the survivors moved into the coop where I could secure them at night. By that time more than half of the flock had been killed.
     
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  5. BarbaraNH

    BarbaraNH Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also don't think that removing the tree will help with the problem. An owl will find them in another tree, as will a raccoon or any other predator that's coming around. I hope you are able to train them to go inside where they can be shut in for the night. Granted that's not easy to do once they are accustomed to roosting outdoors. I certainly do feel for you and your guineas.
     
  6. LoveMyGuineas

    LoveMyGuineas New Egg

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    Taking down the tree makes no sense to me. Any predator finding a food source this time of year will return for free meals. Your guineas will be severely stressed. I strongly advise a coop.
     
  7. tomingreeneco

    tomingreeneco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Somehow, someway get them in a coop. If you have to use a net to catch them or bribe them with treats, they have to go in a coop at night. Once they are in a coop keep them inside of it for a least 6 WEEKS. Only after 6 weeks let some of them out and make sure they come back to be with their buddies come dusk. Do this for a week and then try letting all of them out again. Keep their food and water in the coop so they come back during the day to eat and drink. Good Luck?
     
  8. atmaclean

    atmaclean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My guineas go crazy for plain white millet. Why not try luring them into the coop with a treat like millet? You could also hang CDs in the tree to scare them from roosting in it. The flashing silver scares them and also scares away other predators. I would think that an owl would grab them and fly off to another location to eat them....? I believe that is what a hawk does. I have lost 4 of my smaller sized hens to something over the past 2 weeks and we are relatively sure it is a hawk. They disappear during the day without a trace of anything. It is very upsetting, so I certainly feel for you. My son and husband are on a mission this weekend to eliminate whatever is preying on our little girls. I just hope they are successful!

    We also have an Italian Maremma who guards our livestock but I am not sure he can do anything about the hawks :(

    Best of luck - I know how frustrating it is....
    Angela in NC
     
  9. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Why don't you put a metal skirt on the tree so nothing can climb up the tree, then if you still have losses you will know it is a bird of prey if it happens again.
    Like sour said cut the tree and they move the preditor will still get them in the new tree.

    Sorry for your loss [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2014
  10. gander007

    gander007 Chicken Obsessed

    Can you wrap the bottom part of the tree with tin from two feet above the ground to five feet this will keep any climbing animal from visiting them at night [​IMG]
     

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