Need advise on how to use incubator in a cold house!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Sazbaby, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. Sazbaby

    Sazbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    (Sorry, that should be "advice" lol) We live in a small farm cottage and heat the house with a wood stove with a backup heat pump. Because of this, it is not uncommon for our temperature inside the house to fluctuate quite a bit. The only place I've got indoors where the temperature is fairly stable is the master bathroom (farthest from the wood stove) which is not in use except for an occasional potty run by my youngest- no showers or hair driers, etc. in there to mess with temp or humidity. Problem is, besides being the most stable temp in the house, it's also the coldest- it's usually pretty cold, around 55-60 degrees. I know warmer weather is coming and this won't be as much of an issue, but to help the incubator attain and maintain ideal temp, would it be ok to put it inside of another styrofoam box with the lid propped slightly open to allow ventilation? I have a Hova Bator 1588 Genesis (prior to 2012 model, no digital temp/humidity display), and a Hova Bator 2632N. THey are both used bators and the 2632 seems to have come right up to 99.5 degrees by my thermometer. I've been checking the 1588 with another thermometer and it's around 99.1, but I know they advise leaving it alone for several hatches before messing with the thermostat. Anyhow, just wondering if anyone had experience with this or could offer any insight. I have a large styrofoam cooler I was going to put the bator into to help reduce heat loss in such a cold room... any thoughts? Thanks in advance from an incubating noob!! :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013
  2. Bill 101

    Bill 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most incubator Manufactures recommend a stable environment with a room temperature of 70-80 Degrees, However, most incubators are built with a heating element capable of heating higher than normal set point. It depends on the incubator, but I'd watch (If yours has an indicator light) the indicator light to see how long it's on & how long it's off. You don't have to time it, just count off time. Like off for 20 seconds, on for 10. This is an indication that it can handle cooler ambient temperatures. When it get to 20 seconds on, 10 off, that's an indication that it's probably at it's maximum heating ability.
    You can help retain some heat loss by insulating the bottom & sides. A folded blanket would work well, but make sure the incubator is level. You don't want any water inside to run all to one side. You can also insulate the sides, again don't block air vents.
    Putting it into a larger Styrofoam box would probably work too . Any thing you an do to prevent heat loss is going to help
     
  3. RoosterMoose

    RoosterMoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Put a blanket over it, but leave a hole for the air vent if you are using forced air.
     
  4. Sazbaby

    Sazbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! Firing it up today to get it set hopefully for eggs tomorrow!!! :)
     

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