Need help identifying disease - yellow lesion on comb

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by zoperus, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. zoperus

    zoperus New Egg

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    Feb 27, 2017
    My rooster has a large yellow lesion on his comb, and small yellow ones on his earlobe of the same side. (Best seen in the second photo.) He is also a bit lethargic, and stops crowing mid-crow as if he has a sore throat. He doesn't appear to have any other symptoms yet other than staying close under the light for warmth. (Note that he is a Golden Phoenix, and his earlobe is normally white with the pink tinge at the bottom.)

    We have had crazy weather over the last week with rain, ice storms, snowstorms and temps swinging from high 40's down to freezing like a yo yo. He has a little bit of mild frost-bite as seen top right of the first photo.

    He is such a nice guy. I would sure appreciate any help to figure out what this is, and what to treat him with. Thanks so much!


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  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Hi[​IMG] Welcome To BYC

    I'm sure others will chime in shortly.

    Have you looked inside the beak for any signs of lesions, plaques or canker?

    If you have a vet that can perform testing on the lesion (skin scraping) that would be best.

    It could be Wet Fowl Pox, Canker or some type of fungal infection. It's hard to know.

    If you have a place to separate him that would be best. Look inside his beak to see if there is anything in there. Keep him warm. Encourage him to drink water or you have them add some poultry vitamin to his water. Birds that are ill tend to become dehydrated.
    Give him some chopped egg to see if he will eat after he has been properly hydrated.

    Clean and sanitize your water stations.

    Let us know how he is doing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
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  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I don't have much to add to the great advice WR has given, but are you seeing any mosquitoes out in your area now, or is it too cold? Fowl pox definitely could be possible if mosquitoes, the insects that spread the virus, are out. I have seen peck marks look like that, and if he has been feeling poorly, others may have come up and pecked him sensing that he is weak. Fungal infections are common from the dirt, but the common fungus, favus, that is found on combs is usually white and chaulky. Antifungal creams such as lotrimin or miconazole are frequently used to treat that, and it would not be harmful to use anyway. He obviously looks ill, and aspergillosis from mold fungus or another respiratory disease could be a problem. If you have a local vet who could see him, that might be good to have his droppings checked for worms and other parasites, and to give him a good exam. I agree that getting him to eat and drink, using some electrolytes, and maybe adding water to his feed plus a tsp of plain yogurt daily may help. Keep him warm. He might respond to an antibiotic such as tetracycline or Tylan 50 injectable. Most antibiotics have to come from a vet except for the Tylan 50 which can be given both orally or by injection.
     
  4. zoperus

    zoperus New Egg

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    Feb 27, 2017
    Thanks for your replies! I looked inside his beak...everything looks healthy.

    It has been too way too cold for mosquitoes for almost 3 months now...what the crazy weather did bring on was wild birds seeking shelter....Although his pen is made from 1" chicken netting, I found wild birds of all sizes in with him and his hens. Some could fit through the wire, but the larger ones, I think, were squeezing in the cracks around the door. I have taken measures to stop this, although I'm not sure how to stop the littlest ones. So I worry that they may have brought something in.

    What is normal temp for a chicken? He felt extra warm today, and I'm wondering if I should check that? If he has a temp, would that rule out fungus?
    He has no symptoms of respiratory problems so far... I read up on aspergillosis..sure hope it isn't that...

    I gave him egg, but although he made enticing sounds for the hens and bobbed his head up and down as if eating it, he didn't actually eat any. I will separate him from the hens today...I just have to figure out a place to put them....

    Thanks for the advice. Will update you as things progress.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Temperatures of chickens can vary from 103 to 107 normally, and when they are not eating normally the temperature can drop. So, it is hard to tell if they are feverish, but if he is not eating, he maybe is having fever. Have you checked his crop to see if it is empty, or it is full and puffy? Is he having any gasping or labored breathing? It's difficult to know what is wrong with them when they just stop eating and become inactive. Most of us can't get vets to see our chickens or the cost is so high, but if you could get just a sample of his droppings tested for cocci or worms, it might give you some information. Aspergillosis is hard to diagnose because it is a fungal infection that can travel and cause fungus deposits in the air sacs and travel through the body. It is caused by wet or moldy conditions, and dust or ammonia odors can make it worse. Heavy breathing or gasping, and drinking a lot of water are symptoms. It can be complicated by secondary infections such as viruses or bacterial infections. That may not be his problem at all, as it could be a problem with organ failure or a blockage in his digestive tract. Most of us cannot afford lab work and xrays for chickens. Try putting some feed in a bowl, and add a lot of water, and perhaps some plain yogurt or raw egg, and make a watery gruel that he might want to eat. I hope that he starts to respond.
    Here are a couple of good aticles about aspergillosis:
    http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=15+1829&aid=2384
    https://poultrykeeper.com/respiratory-problems/aspergillosis/
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  6. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    That yellow lesion looks like a frostbite blister. My rooster recently had a bad case of frostbite on his comb, and the middle part of the comb was sporting yellow lesions like that.

    If it's not frostbite, then it looks like it could be fungal, although I lean towards frostbite since you say the low temps have probably led you to believe he has frostbite on his comb.

    I would do as has already been suggested, as a precaution if nothing else, and that's to use an anti-fungal cream on the lesion. Can't hurt.

    He's going to be susceptible to more frostbite if the temp dives again, so I would use Bag Balm liberally on his comb when you expect cold weather to hit.
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    It may be frostbite, it may be fungal, who knows? Typical frostbite looks like the first pic below. The 2 further down show some yellowish on the combs. I would think if Zoperus' rooster had frost bite there would be more dark on the tips which cannot be seen in the picture. A splash of water could have caused it I suppose. The back of the comb has something questionable. I have also seen some burns from heat lamps posted here before. The main thing is to get him hydrated and eating, and he should get better if nothing worse is wrong.

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    frost bite photo by jody jo

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    Rooster with frostbite. Photo by Brigid McCrea from Delaware State University

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    frostbite photo from poultry dvm
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017

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