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Need help with getting a coturnix to breed.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Downesey2732, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. Downesey2732

    Downesey2732 New Egg

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    I have a female and male coturnix Quails and I am trying to get some fertile eggs out of my female. i have seen them breeding though still no fertle eggs. she lays about a egg a day and skips a day every once and a while. does anyone have any suggestions? i candle the eggs 3 days after there layed too if anyone asks. Any help will do. Thanks.[​IMG]
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Firstly, hello and [​IMG]

    About the candling, I don't know how good your setup is, but mine only detects fertility once they're already developing, since it's just a handheld cheap torch, lol. I know some people have candling setups so good they can spot fertile eggs reliably before there's any obvious development though.

    Has she done any sitting on the eggs at all, other than to lay? I don't own quail but hope to, one day, but I know with chooks, turkeys, and other birds that build a clutch bit by bit over time before sitting, the eggs don't develop to any noticeable degree until she is actually brooding. Until then they seem to stay in a sort of stasis, waiting for the regular and longer term heat input.

    I suspect your eggs might develop normally once she starts brooding but I don't know for sure, after all for all I know maybe you're seeing serious defects in the eggs which is your reason for saying they're infertile... Are you deeming them infertile for lack of development or some other reason?

    Best wishes.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I have never heard of anyone being able to tell fertility by simply candling them? Breaking them open or incubating is the only way I know of proving fertility, unless like previous poster said a person has an ultra bright candling set up, though I've never personally heard of anyone having one that good either.
     
  4. Downesey2732

    Downesey2732 New Egg

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    she has been broody on maby one or two eggs for a couple of days but then gives up? i didnt know that you had to wait till it more developed. sorry i breed parrots so poultry isnt realy my specialty. i sorta just go by quails as the same as chickens. ill crack one open and see. thx
     
  5. Downesey2732

    Downesey2732 New Egg

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    should i try artifficial inseminations?
     
  6. Downesey2732

    Downesey2732 New Egg

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    Quote: the egg is fine, good yolk, I enitial thought was no air sac when i was candling though no. good sised air sac, means ive got the humidity. Yess
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I wouldn't, personally, AI in even large birds often results in damage and necrosis, I wouldn't like to risk it in such a small bird, and really quail aren't normally known for being hard to breed...

    Is the male actually mating with her? Reproduction can go wrong at any point and I've had my fair share of males that would mount but not mate. Sometimes the hen would crouch but then just not get into position in terms of turning her tail and moving it out of the way, so no matter what he does it isn't going to happen. Observing the interactions between the male and female can pinpoint some issues.

    Have you wormed them recently? Some worming treatments, and other parasite killers, can cause fertility issues within the next few months to a year; some brands state not to breed them for at least three months after using their product. Anecdotally many people have long term issues after wormings, it pays to remember animals have different sensitivities just like people do, some animals don't take well to some wormers.

    It's odd that she gives up brooding after a few days. That could prevent you seeing any evidence of fertility all by itself. Is she too young? Really if she's brooding at all she should be old enough and should continue to brood...

    Is something disturbing her? Maybe you are, accidentally, some hens cannot stand being checked in on, or maybe it's the male? Some males lack sufficient instinct to leave brooding females be, and will even mount them on the nest, which can be very damaging for both hen and clutch. Is there something environmental that's disturbing her maybe? If she feels the nest isn't safe, many hens will just abandon it. Is it overly exposed maybe?

    Bacterial infection can be another thing that causes her to abandon. Sometimes there's a resident or transient bacteria that either resides in a place or passes through and it can destroy developing embryos, and very quickly they can start to decay, even before showing development this can happen; when this happens the egg begins to resist warming up, cools down abnormally quickly, has a different sound when tapped against the other eggs, and feels different under the hen.

    Smart ones will then reject that egg, but some will just leave the whole clutch. Some very aggressive bacteria transmit via the skin, feathers, nesting material, and contact with other eggs, and can kill even hatching eggs within a matter of hours, by inducing something like toxic shock. Your hen may have some bacteria on the feathers that is killing every clutch and causing her to abandon early.

    If she's just not working out as a broody/mother I'd put her on the backburner so to speak (figuratively if you only want her for eggs, literally if you want her to brood and mother and continue a line with solid and reliable maternal instincts). I'd consider getting another quail hen, maybe a couple, maybe even another breeding pair. I've not done artificial incubation so can't help out with that, sorry.

    Best wishes.
     

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