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Need help with getting ducks

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by vectorfox, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. vectorfox

    vectorfox New Egg

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    Sep 29, 2015
    Hello I'm thinking about getting two ducks but wanted to make sure i can give them the time and attention they need before befriending them. I am studying at uni and working, i was wondering around how much time i would have to give to two ducks so i don't befriend them and realize i can't raise them without them taking away my study time.

    Any insightful information on owning ducks would be very much appreciated in helping to make my decision.

    Thank you for any help!
     
  2. revans2003

    revans2003 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well......I might suggest a dog or cat.

    If your not getting the ducks for companionship or eggs than why have a pet? You are literally saying what is the minimum time I have to spend with them so they don't get attached to me. Two ducks won't be lonely with each other, but they are going to imprint on you from day one. Having ducks is a HUGE commitment and a rewarding one but you have to go into it with the correct attitude.

    While they are in the brooder they need close supervision, after that they need to be introduced to swimming and outdoors, then moved to a coop and taken care of daily with bedding and water changes and protected from predators which is an ongoing responsibility.

    That will take a significant amount of time and based on your post that says you want to do the minimum, I question whether ducks are the correct pet for you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2015
  3. Buck Oakes

    Buck Oakes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Revans is right, I wanted ducks when I was in 5 the grade( and got them) and I'm in 11th grade now and I love them so much! And I think it's a blessing to see they're cute little faces when they see me get home from school ( I free range and they legitimately run up to me when I get out of the car) but I barely have any social time i have to plan my social time out and do 2 days of chores work in one day and 1 day of duck chores is about oh 3 hours maybe possibly more, so it's hard and if u can't put in the time then why even have them? I also hatch all of mine( the Muscovies that is) and they are imprinted on me and I'm pretty much a member of the flock, so if they don't see me one day they can get pretty stressed so yeah for you I wouldn't reccommend Ducks
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2015
  4. jducour

    jducour Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ducks are awesome and adorable. They require a lot of time, though, especially in the first few months. When they are a few days old you really can't leave them for more than an hour at a time. They constantly need their water changed, and bedding cleaned. What would your plans be after brooding the babies? Would you have an outdoor yard for your ducks that is protected from predators? If they were indoor ducks would they be wearing diapers that need to be changed every few hours? There is a lot to think about. I spend about 10 hours a week directly caring and cleaning up after my ducks, and about 10 hours playing with, feeding and watering them. It's a part time job, that needs full time attention. Maybe in a few years when you graduate? I'm afraid that if you got the ducks and didn't spend enough time with them, you would be disappointed in how much they ignore you when they are older.
     
  5. vectorfox

    vectorfox New Egg

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    Sep 29, 2015
    Sorry I seem to have worded this incorrectly, i do want them for companionship and that's why I don't want them if I can't give them the time they deserve, I mean they may as we'll go to someone who is more ready for them.

    I'm well aware of your concerns about me not treating ducks properly, my sister is older than me and she took a rabbit in to take care of it while it finds a permanent home and it didn't get as much attention as a pet should get I'll say.

    So I appreciate all the suggestions and think I will hold off for a while and have a good long think about it. I actually have a 4 week break from work coming up and then a break from uni until next year for next semester.

    My family actually already has a dog and cat however the cat is quite old and the dog is supposed to be my mother's.

    Thank you again for all the your help, I'll still browse because it's still very interesting
     
  6. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

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    You are great for thinking ahead about this! Please take a look at the sticky (link in blue letters at the top of the duck forum index) on Raising Ducklings. Duckling stage was the most demanding for me. I truly withdrew from human society for several months to devote myself to raising my Runners (eleven of them). I regret not one moment. However now that they are adults, I do have more time for humans again. I kid you not. But - that said - one does not have to do what I did. But ducklinghood is time consuming. An option to consider is taking in rescued ducks. Some rescues were raised as pets but then abandoned, so you might be able to find ducks who are very sweet pets. My flock is friendly, but they also have each other.
     
  7. vectorfox

    vectorfox New Egg

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    Wow 11 ducks that must of been a huge undertaking, don't think i even have the room for more than 3.

    My mum actually suggested i get more contact with ducks before deciding if i would want one in my life, adopting a duck was one of the ideas but i haven't been able to find a duck rescue sanctuary yet (i will keep a lookout), i looked at the rspca but they had no ducks at the moment.
     
  8. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

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    Veterinarians sometimes have rescues.
     
  9. jducour

    jducour Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have found all of my rescues through online ads. Do you have something like craigslist in your area? It's a website where people have things they want to sell. An online classifieds? Are you in Europe? I'm not sure the resources you have there.
     
  10. revans2003

    revans2003 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Adopting a duck will result in slightly less work as you wont have to raise them from ducklings. You will still be responsible for all of the other work that has been stated here previously. I don't think getting a rescue duck is the best way to see if you like ducks. What happens if you don't like ducks? What happens if you don't have the time to care for him or her? What happens if you don't secure your yard and a predator eats him or her? It is not fair to a rescue duck or any duck to try it out and see what happens. This is especially true for rescue ducks who came from a bad situation and don't need to go into another one.

    Why don't you find some people close to you who raise ducks and volunteer to help, you may as well get used to doing chores. Then you can experience the reality of duck care and see if it is something you like and have time for.

    If you are bound and determined to get a duck, then begin building your coop, your water source and post up pictures so we can give feedback and ensure that you are going to take care of the responsibility that you claim you want. I am in the process of getting ducklings myself, but I haven't even considered buying them yet as I am still building my pond, then my coop, then my run.
     

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