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Need help with run!!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Armstrong5, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Armstrong5

    Armstrong5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2012
    Hey guys just wondering if I make my run with just a 6 foot welded wire fence if that would be high enough to keep my chickens in... Im getting RIR's and barred rock and hopefully can get black sex link out of it as thats what I want in the long run, love the way the hens look! I dont have any problem with predators such as hawks or any birds of prey so I dont have to woory about things getting in from the top just trying to save on cost so dont really want to put a roof on it but if I have to then I have to.
     
  2. Tweakster

    Tweakster Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2012
    Garden Ridge, TX
    A 6 foot fence will keep most chooks in. I have a white leghorn hybrid from Ideal that used to be able to clear a 6 foot fence. All I did was clip the primary wing feathers on one wing and she not caused any trouble since then. You don't need to clip the feathers on both wings, just one. You'll need to clip the feathers again after the next molt. After that I wouldn't worry about it much more. As the hens get older they also get less ambitious. As a general rule (there are always exceptions) older hens won't go to the trouble jump over tall fences.

    BTW, I have Buff Orpingtons, Easter Eggers, Barred Rock, Austrolorp, and Production Reds, and the Leghorn hybrid was the only one that could clear a 6 foot fence, but she was also the first one to make it out of the brooder too.

    HTH!
     
  3. Armstrong5

    Armstrong5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2012
    Thanks so much!! Yeah thats what my dad was telling me that it was fine just wanted to be sure.
     
  4. Chica Lady

    Chica Lady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2012
    Taylors, SC
    I am new to chickens. I was given 2 grown chickens. A hen and a roo. One day, I let them out to free range and get some excercise. Well, they got into the freshly planted garden. I had to catch them and put them back in the coop. The hen was easy enough to catch, where she only has one eye and I can creep up on her left side easily. The roo on the other hand, we were chasing him for 45 mins to an hour. At one point, he climbed the fence. What he did was to fly up about 2 ft, grabbed onto the fence, then flew up again and got to the top and over to the other side. The fence is 4ft tall.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    On the MN prairie.
    I would put a top on the run. Mainly because once you get chickens, things like raccoons, possums, fox, hawks, and other critters will find them. It doesn't matter if you live in a town, a city or a country. (When my son was going to college in St. Paul, MN, he saw a coyote running across a 4-lane highway!) I understand that you want to save costs, but I think putting a top on will save you both money and heartache in the long run. Oh, and if you're getting your chickens as chicks, you will want to put some hardware cloth around the bottom of your run if you're planning on letting your chicks outside. They'll be able to run right through the larger holes of your welded wire.
     
  6. Hawgon

    Hawgon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Vancouver, WA
    [​IMG]I agree with bobbi-j, put a top on it. Every living thing with teeth wants a chicken snack.....I put 1/2" hardware cloth on all sides of the run and after seeing some comments from others on this website they said suck it up and do the top if financially able. After all the time, money and energy to raise the little buggers it is the least I could do to keep them as safe as possible. My run is about 8x18 and about 7 feet high inside so it wasnt that much more to do the top. The peace of mind is well worth it. Now if I could just get the grand-daughters to shut the run door when they leave each time...lol In the picture you can see the hardware cloth on the top to I think....I used big galvanized staples but some use screws and washers. In other pic you can see how I wrapped hardware cloth on bottom before I put trim on.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  7. Armstrong5

    Armstrong5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 5, 2012
    Is there a cheaper option for roofing then tin?
     
  8. Tweakster

    Tweakster Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2012
    Garden Ridge, TX
    That depends on what you want it to do.

    1. Keep out hawks - use bird netting.
    2. Shed water and keep out hawks - use tin roofing nailed over a wood frame.
    3. Shed water, keep out hawks and most predators 99% of the time - use roofing over plywood (or OSB, it's cheaper).
    4. Raccoon proof it and impress you neighbors - I'd recommend depleted uranium armor. Or you could just close your chooks up in the coop at night, assuming it is raccoon resistant.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. fantastic4

    fantastic4 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2012
    My leghorn rooster cleared 8 ft with one side clipped and I gave up!!!!!!
     
  10. fantastic4

    fantastic4 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2012
    Poultry netting is fine for roof in most areas as most climbers are fliers don't have huge teeth. I would maybe reinforce it with some 2x2 or for now some long small limbs we have these Hog hedge bushes or whatever they are called and they grow straight up and the limb.trunk is up to 10 foot long and about 2 inces in diameter and I have been know =n to use in a pinch
     

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