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Need help with safeguard dosage

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mallory8502, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. Mallory8502

    Mallory8502 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is what I bought I was hoping someone could help me with the dosage for chickens? The directions on the website say give 2.3 ml per 100 lbs referring to goats and cows.... I have no idea. I bought a syringe that will measure down to 0.5 ml. Is it ok to mix it in a gallon waterer? Or do I have to give it to each chicken?

    My chickens are between 5 and 6 months old if that matters. The easter eggers are not big chickens and especially with their age I don't want to overdo it. Also, how long will I need to throw out their eggs?
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I can't remember, LOL. I think I've been giving 0.5 ml.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    1/2 ml is good for an average size chicken, 1/4 ml for a bantam. Give it once, and again in 10 days. It is supposed to be given directly by mouth, not in the water, because it will settle out. Withdrawal time is 14 days from last dose, or 24 days total.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    x2
     
  5. Mallory8502

    Mallory8502 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! and wow, 24 days is a long time... That's over 200 eggs! Can my dog eat those eggs? Or is it safe to dump them in the compost pile?

    I should have mentioned I am treating suspected Giardia, I have no reason to believe they have worms. My dog got Giardia from drinking from a rain barrel, and the chickens were drinking from the same source. I noticed they had diarrhea too and my vet refused to do a fecal or prescribe meds for them. There is no avian vet nearby. I looked for metronidazole for fish at the pet store but with the dosages they offered I would be buying many boxes at $16 per to be able to treat my chickens for 5 days straight. I just could not afford it. I heard safeguard would work against Giardia so I am hoping this is true.

    Of course I check on them today and all of the fresh poops I am seeing in the run look 100% normal. I'm sure I could have overlooked something but I am thinking they might be ok. They have been getting a lot of treats lately from the garden and maybe this caused diarrhea. I'm wondering if it is best to go ahead with the safeguard or wait and see. I hate to worm them at peak egg production (I have heard most people wait until late fall), but I would also hate to be wrong and have sick chickens with infectious poops around the yard that could reinfect my dog!
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Here is an excerpt from /the Merck Veterinary Manual about giardia:
    Treatment

    No drugs are approved for treatment of giardiasis in dogs and cats in the USA. Fenbendazole (50 mg/kg/day for 5–10 days) effectively removes Giardia cysts from the feces of dogs; no adverse effects are reported, and it is safe for pregnant and lactating animals. This dosage is approved to treat Giardiainfections in dogs in Europe. Fenbendazole is not approved in cats but may reduce clinical signs and cyst shedding at 50 mg/kg/day for 5 days. Albendazole is effective at 25 mg/kg, bid for 4 days in dogs and for 5 days in cats but should not be used in these species, because it has led to bone marrow suppression and is not approved for use in these species. A combination of praziquantel (5.4–7 mg/kg), pyrantel (26.8–35.2 mg/kg), and febantel (26.8–35.2 mg/kg) also effectively decreases cyst excretion in infected dogs when administered for 3 days. A synergistic effect between pyrantel and febantel was demonstrated in an animal model, suggesting that the combination product may be preferred over febantel alone.
    Metronidazole (extra-label at 25 mg/kg, bid for 5 days) is ~65% effective in eliminating Giardia spp from infected dogs but may be associated with acute development of anorexia and vomiting, which may occasionally progress to pronounced generalized ataxia and vertical positional nystagmus. Metronidazole may be administered to cats at 10–25 mg/kg, bid for 5 days. Metronidazole benzoate is perhaps better tolerated by cats. Safety concerns limit the use of metronidazole in dogs and cats. A possible treatment strategy for dogs would be to treat first with fenbendazole for 5–10 days or to administer both fenbendazole and metronidazole together for 5 days, being sure to bathe the dogs to remove cysts. If clinical disease still persists and cyst shedding continues, the combination therapy should be extended for another 10 days.
    Currently, no drug is licensed for the treatment of giardiasis in ruminants. Fenbendazole and albendazole (5–20 mg/kg/day for 3 days) significantly reduce the peak and duration of cyst excretion and result in a clinical benefit in treated calves. Paromomycin (50–75 mg/kg, PO, for 5 days) was found to be highly efficacious in calves.
    Oral fenbendazole may be an option for treatment in some birds.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Horses, goats and cows get much less Safeguard (fenbendazole) per pound than dogs, cats, chickens, turkeys, ducks, peafowl, etc.
    • Horses, goats and cows get 5mg/kg
    • Dogs and cats get 50mg/kg for three days

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    If you want to try treating giardia in chickens with Safeguard, I would use the amount that's used in dogs and cats, which is 50mg/kg (.5ml per 2.2 pounds). As for number of days, I'd guess that five would be a good place to start.[​IMG]
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/digestive_system/giardiasis/overview_of_giardiasis.html

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014

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