Need ideas for type of coop and location

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Aberhallo, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Aberhallo

    Aberhallo Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, I am thinking about getting a few chickens in the spring and am so confused by all the different coop styles!

    Sadly, I can't afford to build a permanent structure (nor am I handy) at this time, so am looking at smaller/more portable options to get started.

    I have a few places I could put the coop. One is down by the barn (on grass), the other is close to the house on grass, and third is out across the driveway. There is a flat sandy area, that was a volleyball pit with the previous owner. Which do chickens prefer?

    TSC has this one available for a good price. I've not had much luck with their products though, so I'm wondering what you guys think of it and if anyone here has used it and been happy with it?

    http://www.tscstores.com/FARM-HOUSE-POULTRY-HUTCH-P15973.aspx

    It's not their super small one, it's the one with the nesting box and a small area for them to roam. Is this a good option to start out?

    I thought it was good that the coop itself was raised off the ground a bit, and that they could go under it if it was raining or they wanted some shade from the sun.

    I think in the winter I can put the chickens in a stall in the barn (can they fly out over the top of the stalls?? The bars go up probably 7' - 8') with the horses, and spring through fall I can put them out in their little coop? Does this sound reasonable?
     
  2. Biologrady

    Biologrady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Other people have bashed that coop as not holding up well to the elements, but I have no firsthand experience.

    We saved costs by giving up about a third of the floor space in our 12x8 shed and adding a wire enclosure inside, a pop hole and ventilation. Outside fencing was dog kennel type. Maybe you have existing space you can convert? I'm not very handy either, and it wasn't hard...
     
  3. Aberhallo

    Aberhallo Out Of The Brooder

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    Ah that stinks. I couldn't find any reviews on it, I did see the other one people didn't like but that was the small one. I don't have any shed I can use, unfortunately :(

    When I say I'm not handy, I mean, besides using a power drill, I'm totally useless, so I'd really like to get something prefab or it's probably not going to happen. lol
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2014
  4. Biologrady

    Biologrady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some people score great stuff of Craig's list, sometimes free, or I also use free cycle (google it to view posts in your area). I've seen amazing things done...especially houses that were made from kids plastic outside play houses, dog kennels, and the "treehouse" part of kids' jungle gyms, even a trampoline chicken tractor! Great creative ideas to steal!
    If you decide to buy something, and are pretty sure you're going to keep chickens for the duration, invest in something that is easily accessed (walk in, or a whole wall exposed). Our shed came from costco...a full size, put it together yourself kit that took the better part of a three day weekend, but it was a great bargain at 900. Wee also have a smaller proper Amish coop that cost nearly twice that delivered!
     
  5. chiknhurder

    chiknhurder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My first coop was one of those. They are cheaply built with very thin boards and put together with staples. My first one literally fell apart trying to drag it across the lawn. The store replaced it with a new one and the second night there were young pullets in it, something literally tore it apart and killed 4 of the 4 pullets inside. It was at that point that I decided to build my own. It can be done cheaply with recycled wood and wire. Check on Craigslist under the headings of MATERIALS and FARM & GARDEN for both used lumber and used chicken coops.

    If you can borrow a saw, a hammer, a tape measure, etc. you can build a small coop. The large box stores like Home Depot and Lowes will make the first 3 cuts on a board for free and then charge per cut after that. If you have a material list, they can pre-cut everything for you. Better yet, find a friend or family who is handy with tools and has his/her own tools and have them help you build it. I can provide you with simple details for a small coop.
     
  6. Aberhallo

    Aberhallo Out Of The Brooder

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    Question...can you build a coop with wood from pallets? I can get lots of them at work.

    I might try to build one, my sister said she'd help. This ought to be good. lol I hope it wont' look like a hot mess when I'm done.

    Is there any rules as far as window placement, vent placement etc in terms of directions (north, south, east, west)?

    Ideally, I'd like the run to face south, with the run off the south side, so they get some sun. I'm hoping to have it raised to give them shelter from sun or rain. I thin I will put it on the never used volleyball pit, as it's sand.

    I live in S. Ontario, should my coop be insulated?
     
  7. chiknhurder

    chiknhurder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You'll soon find that your chickens are more likely to seek shade than sun. Mine spend most of the time during the summer months in the shady spots. Wood pallets would be fine. My coop faces west but I have a huge oak tree in the run that shades it during the summer months except for about 30 minutes of sun just before it goes down. This also makes it where I don't have bitter north winds blowing through the coop during the winter or strong winds and rain blowing in during the summer months.
     

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