Need Info on MG

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JacksFarmNGardn, Sep 24, 2016.

  1. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So, I am trying to help a couple friends with an issue.

    Friend A, breeds and sells hatching eggs. Both friends exchanged hatching eggs. Friend A hatched 15/20,2 were own eggs. Friend B said their flock had MG because some were showing symptoms. Friend A shipped a total of 74 eggs. Eggs were due to hatch yesterday. 5 so far. One chick that hatched had a swollen eye, and a grey spot on the other(blind?).the claim of friend A's flock of having MG was made.

    I would really appreciate any links that can inform about MG. there are so many questions I would like to try and answer to help them. Friend A feels their reputation is on the line when it may not have anything to do with them. Friend A would like to test their flock, but don't know where to go for information about doing it.

    Some questions I have pertaining to MG...

    1.Is it possible for chickens to have just a cold, without it being MG?
    2.Is MG airborne or only contagious through contact with leakage(like shared water)
    3.Can an entire flock exist for a year with no signs and still carry it?
    4.is MG passed through eggs of parents who never showed symptoms
    5.can MG be spread to hatching eggs that are turned by hand, from flock owner of known mg?

    Friend B will not test flock because they want to breed for disease resistance. Would their entire flock die if they have it and are not treated?
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I'm sure others will have better input, but a necropsy and testing would be necessary for confirmation of MG. State poultry labs for testing linked below.

    Answers to some of your questions:
    1.Is it possible for chickens to have just a cold, without it being MG? Chickens do not get colds, they get respiratory diseases. There are many that can be very similar, so testing would be best.

    2.Is MG airborne or only contagious through contact with leakage(like shared water)
    "Transmission may be transovarian, or by direct contact with birds, exudates, aerosols, airborne dust and feathers" http://www.thepoultrysite.com/disea...tion-mg-chronic-respiratory-disease-chickens/

    Since MG can be transmitted by different routes, it would be prudent to consider that is is transmitted by shared water. Any infected birds should be separated to possibly limited exposure, but any birds housed/eating/drinking together generally are all considered carriers for life regardless if they ever show any symptoms of illness or not.

    3.Can an entire flock exist for a year with no signs and still carry it?
    That is a hard one to answer. I would have to say "yes". Exposed birds can be carriers, but never show symptoms.

    4.is MG passed through eggs of parents who never showed symptoms
    Transmission may be transovarian, so exposed parent stock would be considered carriers and pass it on.

    5.can MG be spread to hatching eggs that are turned by hand, from flock owner of known mg?
    "MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment." http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    It would be heart breaking and most likely a great loss of money/reputation as well, but some people do "start over". Cull all, clean, sanitize and the start with disease free stock. MG is short lived in the environment. I think I saw waiting 30days was sufficient, but you will need to do a lot of research.

    There is a lot of information on Mycoplasmas here on BYC and the web. Your local Ag Agent and State labs may have better information as well.


    Mycoplasma:
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/p...lasma_gallisepticum_infection_in_poultry.html
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/poultry/mycoplasmosis/overview_of_mycoplasmosis_in_poultry.html
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/disea...tion-mg-chronic-respiratory-disease-chickens/


    Necropsy and State labs
    http://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm
    http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/StateAnimalHealthOfficials.pdf
    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2016
  3. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for all the information, i will be reading it over shortly.
     
  4. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Hi there! I've dealt with both MG and MS extensively so I'll try to answer all your questions. First, could you clarify a few things for me:

    This sentence:

    and this sentence:

    So, firstly, was friend B referring to their own flock already having MG, through separate circumstances to the trade with Friend A, or was the "their flock" referring to Friend A's flock?

    Second: So the birds in question are only a few days old? This would rule out MG. While it can be spread through hatching eggs, you won't see symptoms in the chicks until at least a few weeks after hatch. This sounds more like some type of deformity due to improper incubation or genetic issues in the parent stock.

    To answer your original questions:

    1. In theory, yes, but it's extremely rare. A bird encountering severe environmental issues, e.g. lots of dust or ammonia in the air, might appear to have a "cold." But it would have to be extremely bad - factory farm levels bad. If the birds are cared for even half way decently, this issue isn't going to occur. And while singular birds may experience occasional respiratory infections, symptoms in multiple birds always rule this out. What this boils down to is 99.999% of the time, when you're seeing respiratory issues in multiple birds, it's going to be an infectious respiratory disease like MG.

    2. It's not airborne - it's only spread through bodily fluids, e.g. mucus, blood, droppings.

    3. Possibly, but probably not, depending on flock size and when they were infected. Most birds will show symptoms when they first become infected, but after the initial period of infection, symptoms will often subside and may never reappear or may only reappear during times of stress. So, yes, it's possible, but I wouldn't say it's likely.

    4. Yes, but it's rare. Transmission rates in eggs are around 10% from symptomatic parents, 3-4% from asymptomatic parents, and less than 1% from parents recently medicated with Denagard or Baytril. So even a very infectious bird does not shed that heavily through the eggs.

    5. Yes, MG can be present or be transferred to the shell of the egg through contact during the laying, collection, or incubation of the egg. Chicks would have the potential for exposure upon hatch.

    I'm not sure why someone would refuse to test if they wanted to breed for resistance. Testing is the most important thing you can do. It's how I discovered that it's possible for some birds to be so immune they are incapable of even becoming infected or transmitting the disease - a hidden goldmine that wouldn't even be realized without blood testing. And no, birds do not have to be treated - but the most susceptible have the potential to die. If you wanted to breed for resistance, you wouldn't want to medicate at all - any bird weak enough to die without medication makes it an automatic cull from the breeding program.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
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  5. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 26, 2015
    New York


    To try clarification of first issue. Friends lived in NY. Friend B was moving to NC in a month. Friend A visit friend B, and picked up the hatching eggs. Friend B moves, friend A ships the 74 eggs to NC. Friend B said MG became present in the flock after the move due to stress. Friend B culled entire flock last fall and started over in spring.

    Second clarification issue, bird in question was newly hatched. It died that evening.

    About number 1. Friend B now says flock is showing active signs of MG AND fowl pox now. I originally wondered if friend just thought his flock had mg, but wondered if it was just cold symptoms. With fowl pox now, it can have mg symptoms as well, could it be environmental at the new home?

    I will present some of your information to friend B.

    A few new questions. Friend A still has pullets from friend A's eggs. Should they be concerned that they are carriers of something? Friend A thinks that only 5 chicks lived and even with the ones that hatched and died, friend B did something really wrong during incubation.

    We think friend B will not test the flock because they would have to cull and atart over again. It doesn't make sense that they culled the flock before and now wont with claims of disease resistance. Friend B said they would still sell eggs/chicks even knowing they are carriers and wouldnt admit it to someone even if they asked! Sounds horribly wrong to me!
     

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