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Need some help from those that sew

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by Razadia, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. Razadia

    Razadia The Odd One

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    So, I've decided to set out on a new project. The problem is I know next to nothing about sewing faux fur. Can anyone give me some pointers on how to go about keeping the fur from catching in the seems? Is there any particular stitch I should use to keep it together? (I like hand sewing things better than using a machine.) Any help at all would be great. I'll be posting pics when I get started on the project.
     
  2. jenifry

    jenifry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It really depends on WHAT you are making, and how much pressure the seams are going to be under. I use a serger on faux fur when the seams have to hold up to a lot of wear (say a garment). If it's just a covering for something, or a hat, I comb or press the fur away from the seam as I pin pieces together and use a longer stitch on my sewing machine (about 8 stitches to an inch) with a 3/8" seam. It should work the same for hand sewing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2012
  3. Razadia

    Razadia The Odd One

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    It will be going through a lot of wear. Thank you for the advise!
     
  4. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It also depends on the length and "thickness" of the fur. Some of the faux furs that are longer, like 1" or more, can have a less dense fur than a 3/8" fur I used on one of my projects. After the first seam, I remembered that my mom used to snip off the edge of the fur on really dense fake fur before she sewed it together, so I snipped off the fur where the seam was going to be. It really cut down on the bulk, but you have to be carefull to only sahve it where the seam is because you don't want the bare spot showing on the finished project.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. rockingbearanch

    rockingbearanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Each fur is different and challenging to sew. Remember that there is a grain, or direction that the fur lays. I've forgot several times and cut a piece where the fur was going to look upside down and then didn't have enough fabric left to fix it. You may have to use extra yardage depending on the pattern and the grain. It really adds to a costume, like for a tiger, if you line up the stripes rather than just cutting randomly. Use pins. It can really shift and stretch. Where multiple edges meet, hand sewing may be necessary. Use upholstery thread since you're going for heavy use. After your finished, use a stick or comb to fluff out the seams so they don't show as bad. If you are going to really wear it longer than a trick or treat outing, a lining is going to be more comfortable than a leotard. You don't have to seal the seams to stop fraying but you may find covering the seams with bias or lace is more comfortable. I've worked on a few mascot costumes where comfort and movement matter as much as looks. It is hard on sewing machines so take your time and your project will look all that better.
     
  6. Razadia

    Razadia The Odd One

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    Thank you for the advice. I still haven't gotten started yet, but hopefully I will soon. It seems like most of our craft and fabric stores don't have faux fur. [​IMG]
     

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