Need to dispatch "over-ripe" rooster. Any good recipe suggestions?

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by IdasChickens, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. IdasChickens

    IdasChickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Back Yard Chicken Keepers! Hope you and your flocks are well!

    So, as you can see from my post title, we have a rooster that needs to go. He is just waaaayy too rough with the ladies. And he is kinda, well, a chicken...but I guess I can't blame him too much there (he always runs away first if there seems to be any kind threat about!)
    Anyway, we would like to put him on the table. Problem is, he is a bit older, about 8 months. Buff Orpington.
    Any suggestions for our very first home grown bird?
    Anything from tips on what we should feed him before the "big day" to dispatching to your favorite recipes, are greatly appreciated!

    We also have a few drakes, too many. Any good duck recipes/most humane ways to dispatch a duck (or is it the same as a chicken?), would also be most helpful...

    Thank You all so much!
    Idaschickens
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  2. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    What I do, is dispatch, skin, eviscerate and then put the bird whole in my crockpot (no rest period). I don't add anything else to the crockpot - no liquid, oil or seasonings. I set it on the low setting and let it cook for 8-10 hours. By the end of cooking, the meat is so tender it is literally falling off the bones. The bird has steamed in its own juices so it is really moist too. Once it is cooked and cooled, I pick the bones out of the crockpot and I'm left with the meat that I can then use in multiple casserole or soup type dishes. I've done birds that were 3 years old this way and they still came out tender and moist. Depending on the size of the bird, I can get 3-6 casseroles out of them.
     
  3. IdasChickens

    IdasChickens Out Of The Brooder

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    That sounds absolutely delicious (and easy too, well, the recipe part anyway!) Thank you, HeChicken! So, right into the crockpot while "still warm", eh? I've only ever read to let them rest first...but this is why I asked! [​IMG] Good to hear this works for much older birds too. Thanks again!

    Anyone else? Still looking for expertise advice, always nice to have several options!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I butchered a 4 year old rooster a few months ago. Killed, cleaned, quartered and in the pressure cooker, about 40 min and same results as above--pulled the meat and used it for enchiladas.
     
  5. IdasChickens

    IdasChickens Out Of The Brooder

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    My worries about cooking up older birds are fading! Thanks, donrae!
    Our roos name is actually "Tamale". I named him that one day after he gave me a nice bite on the hand [​IMG] while I was cleaning out the coop! I think he has known his days were numbered since then. Enchiladas sound like a much better idea though. The family loves enchilada casserole and its a lot easier to make than tamales!
     
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  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    You're welcome!

    The meat will NOT be like store bought chicken though. It will have more tooth to it, and will require some chewing vs store chicken you can practically mush and swallow. I guess the best analogy would be a medium/lower quality cut of steak vs veal--still good, just more mature.
     
  7. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Interesting....I've heard that quite often. I can't tell a difference. On the other hand, I haven't eaten store-bought chicken in so many years maybe I just don't remember.
     
  8. Does anyone have a roasting recipe for year old cocks? I've got 3 that I dispatched and have in the refrigerator, resting. They are beautiful carcasses and I'd like to roast them whole to set on the table like a turkey. Any way to roast them whole and have them be tender?

    I've done the crockpot thing and it works great for enchiladas, etc., but its an aesthetics thing. These really are beautiful birds and I'd like to serve them that way.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  9. IdasChickens

    IdasChickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Lacy Blues,

    You've probably already received an answer, seeing as how this is over a month old now (forgot my password) but, I would say, "Go low and slow". That is my usual rule of thumb in roasting any tougher cut of meat. Again, sure you figured that out.... How did the birds come out?

    As for my roo, well, we didn't end up eating him. He caught a "cold" or something before we were able to butcher and we decided that for our first experience with "wild" chicken, we should probably do it right....also, not eating sick animals [​IMG]..... Unfortunately, he still needed to go. He was VERY mean to everyone, especially his hens. And he kept getting sick. Just not worth it to keep or even try and give away. [​IMG]

    Thanks again everyone for your awesome advice! I will keep it book marked for the future when we do these new meat roos we have, the "right" way!

    Idas Chickens
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
  10. Soltaria

    Soltaria Chillin' With My Peeps

    Another thing you can do with a tough bird it run it through the meat grinder.
    I like to take the ground stuff and make chicken cordon bleu out of it.
    You make like a burger patty and stuff the middle with as much ham and swiss cheese as you can fit in it, then put another "patty" on top and form it like a ball.
    You can roll this in corn meal and flour and fry it or roast it in the oven as is and both ways turn out great.
    I also like to make a cream sauce to pour over it if I'm feeling fancy.
     

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