??? Need to worm just TWO hens out of the flock (w/valbazen)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by gritsar, May 6, 2011.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I'm not sure how to handle the eggs from two hens that need worming.

    I worm my older flock, my brahmas, like clockwork with valbazen (albendazole) each November. This past November we went ahead and wormed my younger flock too. They were only six months old at the time so I was nervous about doing it, but I know valbazen is very safe so we went for it. We did not worm my two 6 month old silkies at the time because I felt they were just too small.

    Now in that younger flock I have two hens with chronically dirty bottoms. One is a silkie (though not the one currently raising chicks) and one is a speckled sussex. I would like to worm them to see if that clears up their bottoms.

    My question concerns what to do about their eggs; the egg withdrawel period. I think I can identify their individual eggs in the nestbox, but I'm not sure. Both lay small eggs and the SS's eggs have a strange color pattern to the shell, so they wouldn't be sold but instead kept for my family's use.

    Realistically, do I even need to worry about the small amount of valbazen we might consume should we happen to eat eggs from these two during the two week withdrawel period? Right now my DH is on an egg boycott (he says he's sick of them [​IMG] ) so there's a chance the dogs or the chickens would be getting the eggs anyhow.

    I'm thinking it's not going to be that much of an issue & I should go ahead and worm them. Your thoughts?
     
  2. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Can you isolate them near their flockmates? Just fence off a smaller area for them?
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Ranchy, you have a general idea of how things are situated with the coops right now. Isolating them, when I have so many broodies in special spaces, would be impossible right now.
     

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