Need your ideas on conserving Endangered Breeds...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by chicknfun, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. chicknfun

    chicknfun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello Chicken Lovers-

    We are talking about starting a very small conservation project, maybe 3 or 4 breeds.

    I am posting to try to get some ideas and info from the BYC community.

    ANY ideas, thoughts, opinions, concerns are welcome, but I do have a few specific questions.....

    * What breeds are most in need of conserving?

    * To help spread the breed, would it be best to hatch and sell chicks, or sell hatching eggs?

    * How many hens per rooster?

    * Who would you go to to get the best breeding stock of any particular species? (In other words, who has the best breeding stock of specific endangered breeds?)

    * Is there anything , in particular, different about keeping endangered chickens as opposed to keeping other types of chickens?


    [​IMG]I want to say Thank You in advance for any responses.....After we gather info from this thread, we will decide if / how to proceed.
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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  3. RhodeRunner

    RhodeRunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What breed is in need of conservation? To many! Don't pick a breed based only on it's conservation status. Pick a breed that will adapt well to your lifestyle and climate. Finding a good match will make you more dedicated to the project, and keep you happier with the breed.

    To help spread the breed? Do what is comfortable to your lifestyle. If that is just maintaining the breed on your own, that is fine. If you want to sell chicks, hatching eggs, or birds that is also fine.

    How many hens per rooster? This doesn't have an answer. For me most of the time it is dependant on the breeding pens, and number of birds I have for breeding. Some of my breeding groups are paired off, others live in quads. Some breeders keep much larger flocks, and actually have multiple roosters in them. Ultimately, you do not want to exceed twelve hens, or fertility will suffer.

    Who would I go to? That really depends on the breed we are talking about. Figure out the breed(s) you want, then ask this question.

    Anything different about these breeds? That really depends on the breed you raise. Do you want them to be different? I will say the traditional poultry tend to mature a lot slower, get bigger, and are usually calmer. Depending on the breed, they may have some genetic faults.

    This all being said...start small! Jumping into a bunch of breeds is not going to help you, or the birds. At this point in breeding you will not know what to do. Also, the more birds you keep the less you can help all of them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
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  4. chicknfun

    chicknfun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, I had a really hard time choosing where to post. Is it possible to move the thread?
    Thanks for the input, need correct category for best responses!!
     
  5. Rocky Maley

    Rocky Maley Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think that there are lots of breeds that are reconized by the APA ANS ABA THAT NEED WORK. the problem lies in the colors. For example buff d' anvers was reconized as a showable color but they are gone. Bantam campines try to find them a standard breed but none around. If you are in it to make money good luck. Yoe have to do it becouse of the love of the breed. And not by pouler opinion there is no such thing as a rare breed every breed was man mad if it was made ounce it can be made again. So you need to fins a breed you feel strongly about and do every thing you can to improve the beed and color

    Rocky
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I think this thread is where it needs to be. But if you post in that other thread you will get some really good advice from people that are doing what you are talking about doing.

    By the way, I agree with everything Rhoderunner said, especally the part about starting small. You have a learning curve to go through. If you jump in too deep too fast, you are more likely to get frustrated and burn out.
     
  7. chicknfun

    chicknfun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great advice, Thanks!
    Part of why i posted is because I cannot decide what breed(s) to choose. We live in Northeastern Florida, not very cold in Winter, and the area where the coops will be built is very nicely shaded, and will not get too hot.
    There will be no free ranging, as we have all kinds of wild things that eat chickens.
    I guess I just really don't know where to start the decision process for choosing
    I would have a flock of every breed, if that were realistic, but .....LOL.... I am setting my limit at no more than 4 breeds because I want each little flock to have PLENTY of space. I suffer really badly from 'chicken math', and have to keep that in check for the sake of the project chickens!!

    DH suggested that one roo with 3-5 hens would be good, and I wouldn't really want more than that, as we have somewhat limited resources / space. The idea is to add one breed per year, which will give us time to build each coop / run.

    Yes, I want to do a good thing for whichever breed(s) are chosen, that is the motivation!!
    Thank you so much for the input!!
     
  8. chicknfun

    chicknfun Chillin' With My Peeps

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  9. RhodeRunner

    RhodeRunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Raising any breed is pretty much the same? Not at all! Within different breeds you will see a dramatic difference in personality, production, appearance, and overall raising experience. We are working with five breeds, and none are the same.

    When picking your birds you need to determine. (Your climate makes you capable of raising most anything...but do stay away from the extremely cold hardy breeds like the Chantecler and Hedemora.)
    Do you want something docile?
    Broody or not?
    How important is egg and meat production?
    Is egg color important?
    Is rate of maturity a concern?
    Do you want something that is easy to sex?
    and the list goes on.....

    I suggest writing down the list of requirements you have for you birds. Then look at the breeds, and X out whatever doesn't match.
     
  10. chicknfun

    chicknfun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I totally agree....Funny you should mention Campines...DH likes them very much! They are near the top of our list of choices.
    We are not planning on showing, but i do realize the importance of adhering to breed specific standards, as it relates to helping the breed.
    Not in it for the money at all.....just would like to sort of 'pay it forward' to chickens, as I have time on my hands to devote, and adore them all. Really just want to try to do something that helps to keep up the numbers of a breed or so that may be on their way out.

    I love the Sumatras and the Phoenix
    OMG, i cannot decide, I love them all I've never seen a chicken that i didn't think was beautiful!!
    Thank you so much!!!
     

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