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Needing help identifying

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Anderson Lowe, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. Anderson Lowe

    Anderson Lowe Out Of The Brooder

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    Initially I was told this was a Phoenix bantam, but upon doing some research to identify, she's looking like an English Old Game Bantam.

    Can someone with more knowledge and vast experience help a newbie out with this.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think you may have a mix with some Phoenix genes present. Here are some pix of my Old English Game Hens. I have 4 now. You can see the resemblance for sure.
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    This one is going thru molt so no tail feathers at this time.
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    The angle of the pix cuts off her tail, but she has tail just as yours does.
     
  3. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    She is a Ginger Red Old English Game Bantam... :)
     
  4. bantamsumatras

    bantamsumatras New Egg

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    I found some very similar birds at the link below...long tail breeds are very desirable in show because they do really well...therefore serious breeders have begun attempting to breed New color varieties. ...including ginger red...the birds shown have blue thanks and white lobes...similar to your bird.....
    http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/CGP/Phoen/BRKPhoenix.html
     
  5. bantamsumatras

    bantamsumatras New Egg

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    I love long tail breeds!! They do awesome in exhibitions! And because of this a lot of serious breeders have begun attempting to come up with New (and beautiful) color varieties. This is a very smart move because if I am the only one with blue silver or blue golden duckling Phoenix and the apa accepts my variety I have possession of an entire variation and will be able to win (like every) more shows and make more money selling eggs and chicks. However this is not something that happens over night and along the way some oddities come about. You have a lovely pullet but before dismissing her as oeg I'd check out the photos at the link below. Someone somewhere has begun breeding ginger red Phoenixs. Just saying, they look similar to your bird.....

    http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/CGP/Phoen/BRKPhoenix.html
     
  6. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    The pullet is not Phoenix, tail is not right at all for it and the legs are fully slate as they should be for Ginger Red OEGB... I used to have them, that's why I recognize her... :)
     
  7. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    There's an issue with your thoughts on cornering the market on a new variety... the APA requires a minimum of 5 years of breeding true at 50% of the time and must have *I think* at least 5 breeders involved... the more breeders, the better the chances of acceptance... it is a long and difficult process so I wish you luck in your endeavors...

    Btw, in that link there isn't a Ginger Red Phoenix, only Brown Red Phoenix...
     
  8. Rhodebar Lover

    Rhodebar Lover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. No Phoenix there. :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted

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    Is it actually "winning" if you have no competition? What exactly would you be winning?
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    I agree
     
  11. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Looks like a Ginger Red Old English Game to me, too. RavynFallen is correct: there are requirements that need to be met when trying to admit a new breed or variety into the APA Standard of Perfection. At least five breeders must have bred the new breed/variety for not less than five years, producing offspring that are at least 50% true to color/type. Then, various amounts of birds of that breed/variety must be exhibited at certain shows and reviewed by judges and the APA before becoming a recognized breed or variety.

    It is perfectly good (and fun) to come up with new varieties of breeds or even new breeds. However, I would consider being the only person with a breed/variety to be undesirable. You would not gain much recognition by showing only against yourself, your single gene pool of birds would become inbred, and the breed/variety would not survive if you stopped raising them. Developing a new breed or variety of poultry takes cooperation among breeders and many years of work.
     
    2 people like this.

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