Neighbors dogs got my birds, how much should he pay to replace them?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by omnislash, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. omnislash

    omnislash Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2009
    Goodlettsville
    The next door neighbors boxer and pit bull puppy took out 1/4 of my flock this afternoon. I had no idea the birds were out, they were supposed to be locked in their coop and out in the fenced in chicken yard. My husband heard the chickens making a lot of noise and went outside to see the neighbors dogs messing with them. The dogs ran home and we tried herding the chickens and ducks back inside. I found one of my khaki campbells bleeding and hurt under a tree. I took her in put her in a box and offered her water. I left her with my oldest daughter to look after her and went back outside. My husband went over to the neighbors house and knocked on their door. They found their dogs chewing on 2 dead chickens, and a stray leg. The neighbor said he will pay to replace them and I'm not sure what the cost will be to replace them all. The injured duck died soon after we found her. I have always got my birds day old, I have no idea what to ask for grown birds. I know you all know how much work and time goes into raising chicks. The dead include a 1 1/2 year white cochin bantam rooster. 2, 6 1/2 month old light brahma hens, they have been laying for about 3 weeks. 1 light brahma rooster, same age as the hens. and 2 khaki campbell duck hens. They were almost 4 months old, not laying yet but far from babies. There is also 1 brahma rooster missing i hope he will turn up, but I'm doubtful. Thank you in advance for any info you might have.
     
  2. dieselgrl48

    dieselgrl48 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2010
    Virginia
    Gosh I dunno for that many .My Neighbor wrote me a check once for $50 for 3 young Standard Sumatra.I got a list from the Va.Cooperate extension that has a basic list of price of poultry cost per bird.You might check and see if your local one has a listing like that.Looking for the link I had now.Sooo sorry about your bird's. [​IMG]
     
  3. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

    Feb 3, 2009
    Hope Mills, NC
    I'd find out how much the chicks cost you and then say a cup of food a day for how many days you had them. That way they pay for feed and chicks they lost, or pay for replacement pullets/hens. Also, I'd have them pay and damage to the coop/run and a consideration cost.
     
  4. spottedtail

    spottedtail Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 5, 2007
    Minnesota
    Well... you say the birds were supposed to be locked in their coop which is
    inside the fenced chicken yard.
    But they were not..... If they were in there, you'd probably have no losses.

    There seems to be fault on both ends.
    The neighbor was at fault because his dogs were roaming off his property.
    You were at fault for an oversight which allowed a lapse in your birds security.

    If this was my situation, I'd add up fair losses, then discount it by
    30, 40 or 50%.
    The percentage would depend on what I feel is my honest 'at fault responsibility'.
    Then I'd present the neighbor with his share of the costs, explaining the discount for the responsibility I share in this loss.

    I think this is the most honest and accurate way to handle this situation.
    And it's a good way to preserve goodwill between you and the neighbor.

    Good luck,
    spot
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  5. lizardz

    lizardz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2007
    Grass Valley, CA
    So very sorry for your loss. [​IMG] He has offered to replace your pets, and it's true that no amount of money can cover that. What you can expect is what it would cost to replace those lost if you were to buy chickens/ducks of the same kind/age. Look in your paper or wherever you can to find out what the going rate is, somehow document that, then give him the bill. Some on here will say he should pay for cost of the birds, feed you've bought to raise them, your time, etc., but the truth is, market value is what replacement cost means. Again, so sorry you lost your babies.
    Liz
     
  6. city kid farm

    city kid farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Massachusetts
    I understand the "being honest due to some fault" post, but were the birds on your property? If so I wouldn't go too steep on the discount. You should have the right to let your animals free on your land without being harassed by animals that are owned (and presumably under the control of) by others. I know this is a stretch but, what if the dogs had bit a child? Would it still be partially your fault for letting your kid play in the yard? Sorry - I am a bit sensitive to this since a similar situation did happen between a neighbor dog and my child. And as a dog owner myself, I make every effort to keep my dog controlled.

    I may be a big softy of the backyard variety, but my chickens are not only food (some day) producers and an investment in terms of time and money, but they are also pets. I can only think of it that if a neighbor's dog killed a beloved cat in my yard and offered compensation. I can't imagine how I would compute a sum of money to make up for the loss to me personally.

    Just another view. I am so sorry for your loss. Good luck.
     
  7. slackwater

    slackwater Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 1, 2010
    SoMD
    I know it sucks...but kudos to your neighbor for immediately offering up the replacement. So many people complain that their neighbors are oblivious...yours obviously is not.

    If my neighbor were that apologetic, I would probably reduce the "fee" that I would assess. If they were an *** about it, that's when I would start upping the price. Just my way of doing business, I guess. The more people object to being at fault, the more it costs them [​IMG]

    And no, you should not discount just b/c your chickens were out, even if they weren't supposed to be, if they were on your land. It is HIS job to keep HIS dogs on HIS property.
     
  8. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2008
    Oklahoma
    Check with the hatcheries that sell P.O.L. (point of lay) pullets if you don't have actual feed and care costs. That would be a good starting point for replacement cost.
     
  9. spottedtail

    spottedtail Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 5, 2007
    Minnesota
    Quote... "It is HIS job to keep HIS dogs on HIS property".


    Ahhh...but do you really want the security of your birds to depend on your neighbors ability to keep his dogs on his property? ..Really?.. You have 100% confidence he can do that 100% of the time??
    I'm aware this "my neighbors better keep their dogs off my property" line of thinking is very common, but it invites trouble down the road. Don't think that way. Don't put the safety of your flock in his hands!

    As owners and the ultimate protector of our birds, we must provide the last and best barriers against loss.

    Our birds are not neighbor Joe's responsibility. He's got dogs. Dogs get loose!
    Want to put your birds safekeeping with him, and hope for the best??? You do? Then count on losses, they're coming someday.
    Defend against that friendly lovable mutt!!

    Our birds are not Mother Natures responsibility. She's got dozens of predators with no kennels, leashes or property lines! Mom Nature is a great gal, but her kids are so mischievious!
    We must defend against her too. And hard!

    It's OUR responsibility in the end. If we lapse we will suffer losses eventually.
    It really doesn't matter how it happens. We just need to own up to it and protect better.

    We are like goalies.
    When our mates slip-up, it's up to us to make the final save.
    If we don't, we share responsibility in the loss.

    spot
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  10. Show Me Chick

    Show Me Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 10, 2010
    spottedtail wrote: Well... you say the birds were supposed to be locked in their coop which is
    inside the fenced chicken yard.
    But they were not..... If they were in there, you'd probably have no losses.

    There seems to be fault on both ends.
    The neighbor was at fault because his dogs were roaming off his property.
    You were at fault for an oversight which allowed a lapse in your birds security.

    If this was my situation, I'd add up fair losses, then discount it by
    30, 40 or 50%.
    The percentage would depend on what I feel is my honest 'at fault responsibility'.
    Then I'd present the neighbor with his share of the costs, explaining the discount for the responsibility I share in this loss.

    I think this is the most honest and accurate way to handle this situation.
    And it's a good way to preserve goodwill between you and the neighbor.

    Good luck,
    spot

    Are you kidding me?!!! She doesn't have to keep her birds locked up if they are staying in her yard!!!! If her birds are on her propertry and some stupid neighbor dogs comes and kills them then guess what?!!! The neighbors letting their dumb dogs roam should pay!!!​
     

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