Neorological problem in 8 week old Frizzle?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by haleyd, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. haleyd

    haleyd Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a flock of beautiful 8 week old bantams that I got from Murray Mcmurray Hatchery, and now one of them has some kind of problem. This is a white frizzle, and I noticed yesterday that she was staggering around, tipping back and forth, acting like she couldn't catch her balance. She was still doing normal things like eating, but she looked almost drunk! Does anyone have any idea of what could be causing the problem, and is there anything I can do? I'd be really dissapointed to lose her.
     
  2. JerseyGiantfolk

    JerseyGiantfolk Overrun With Chickens

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    She could have Marek's disease. Isolate her, keep her warm and well fed. You can get some Poly-vi-sol with no iron for her. (You can find it at drugstores: Walmart, Safeway, ect.) The dosage is .5 mL per quart of water. This is not proven to heal infected birds, but it gives her a "boost" with vitamins.

    I'm pretty sure all chicken owners will come across Marek's some time or another. It's a common disease in growing chicks.

    Also, welcome to BYC. [​IMG]
     
  3. haleyd

    haleyd Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks:) She was vaccinated for Marek's by the hatchery, but I'll treat her anyway.
     
  4. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Sounds much more like a deficency than anything> I do not think it's mareks. She's too young. It takes much longer than that to show in chicks.

    Poly-V-Sol is a good recommendation, as it will take care of that deficiency. Medicated feed can cause deficiencies in Thiamine which shows symptoms like you are mentioning.

    "And there is another large factor to consider with amprollium. This drug’s main purpose is to block thiamine uptake. All living things need thiamine – which is also known as vitamin B1 - in order to grow and be healthy"

    According to the Merk Veterinary Manual:

    "Polyneuritis in birds represents the later stages of a thiamine deficiency, probably caused by buildup of the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism. In the initial stages of deficiency, lethargy and head tremors may be noted. A marked decrease in appetite is also seen in birds fed a thiamine-deficient diet. Poultry are also susceptible to neuromuscular problems, resulting in impaired digestion, general weakness, star-gazing, and frequent convulsions.

    "Polyneuritis may be seen in mature birds ~3 wk after they are fed a thiamine-deficient diet. As the deficiency progresses to the legs, wings, and neck, birds may sit on flexed legs and draw back their heads in a star-gazing position. Retraction of the head is due to paralysis of the anterior neck muscles. Soon after this stage, chickens lose the ability to stand or sit upright and topple to the floor, where they may lie with heads still retracted. Thiamine deficiency may also lead to a decrease in body temperature and respiratory rate. Testicular degeneration may be noted, and the heart may show slight atrophy. Birds consuming a thiamine-deficient diet soon show severe anorexia. They lose all interest in feed and will not resume eating unless given thiamine. If a severe deficiency has developed, thiamine must be force-fed or injected to induce eating."
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  5. haleyd

    haleyd Out Of The Brooder

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    Very interesting. I actually have injectable thiamine for our goats, so I'll look into using it for the Frizzle. Thanks for the info, I'd never have found this by myself!
     
  6. Coupe

    Coupe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a 5 week old doung the same thing..everyone saud its mareks but i dont know how she would have got it, she hasnt been in contact with any other birds or even near another chicken besides her hatch mates....everyone else in the bunch are fine..i went out last night and got poultry vitamin drench which was cheaper than the poly vi sol...i hope it works..i noticed thus morrning she isnt tilting her head back funny anymore and she is eatting better.
    Can someone explain how chicks get meraks?
     
  7. maidenwolfx80

    maidenwolfx80 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Vit E is great for neurologic problems. I have helped lots of my chicks with it. Take a vit E capsule and poke it with a needle and squeeze half in their mouth twice a day.
     
  8. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    It's sad that our foods we are feeding them lack so many nutrients and are causing these type of issues.

    I will never buy medicated feed again. Just my opinion on the matter.
     
  9. maidenwolfx80

    maidenwolfx80 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I learned that the hard way too. I have since switched to nonmedicated. The bad thing is the feed store in town doesnt sell non medicated so I have to go 20 mins into the next town for feed instead 3 mins up the road oh well , its worth it for the health of my birds. I think we are all told that the feed with medicine is good so they dont get sick and while it does do its job, it causes so many other issues.
     
  10. Coupe

    Coupe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wasnt feeding medicated...i have always fed dumor chick grower, never had a problem till now..i dont know what it is..but i dont think its meraks Because my chicks have never been near other birds.
     

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