Neurologic Roo?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by valmom, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. valmom

    valmom Chillin' With My Peeps

    229
    1
    131
    Sep 23, 2007
    Vermont
    Our big rooster, Butterball, has been going downhill for 4 days now. These chickens are pets and my SO is attached to them. So, we took him to the vet. He is lethargic, uncoordinated, and he twists his neck. His crop also feels impacted.

    Vet says it could be viral or bacterial, we are injecting antibiotics until we can clear his crop and he can take tablets. We are also doing sub cu hydration. He is actually looking a little brighter and starting to object more to being handled than he was, but his floppy twisted head and uncoordination isn't improving. He has been 2 days now on antibiotics.

    Is there any hope that if we can keep "life support" going long enough he will recover? The neurologic symptoms are really worrisome. (I don't think our vet thought he would make it this far...)
     
  2. lovethechickens

    lovethechickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    153
    1
    131
    Feb 16, 2008
    Antioch California
    Is your vet an avian vet? They should have done a blood test for new castles. Did you have any bloodwork done at all?
     
  3. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    check his crop for impaction.

    give Poly-vi-sol liquid baby vitamins (Enfamil brand, no iron)..3 drops on beak once a day.
    and make sure he is hydrated..

    is he eating?
    is he able to eat?
    is he able to drink?

    it's possible he does have New Castle Disease.

    or if he is impacted..lacking in nutrients..a deficiency of certain vitamins can cause neuroligic symptoms..

    is it possible he got into something bad?(such as kitchen scraps that went bad, compost pile, contaminated water, feed that went sour, any poisons..(lawn/garden chemicals, motor oils, rodent poisons, etc.)
     
  4. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

    4,871
    23
    251
    Jan 11, 2007
    there are several things which can cause this symptom (newcastle is pretty rare) ... salt (think treats) ... dehydration >(you mentioned you were giving subcu fluids to rehydrate and waiting for crop to empty> that is good to treat first as your vet has advised)

    What breed is this bird?
    What is its normal diet?
    What are the temps where you are at?
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2008
  5. valmom

    valmom Chillin' With My Peeps

    229
    1
    131
    Sep 23, 2007
    Vermont
    The vet is the only one locally who treats birds, and he didn't do any blood work. He basically said that by the time any results came back the bird would be recovered or dead.

    We don't keep or use anything poisonous for the bugs or yard, no pesticides. Our compost pile is just horse manure, no garbage. He does free range with the girls a few hours a day, but none of them are showing the same signs. I also have no idea how to feed roos separately from the girls- they have layer pellets down all the time, and I toss sunflower seeds, oats and a bit of corn for treats. And spaghetti with oil on it every few days. And all the bugs they can eat.

    It's not hot here at all yet- still in the 60's and cooler at night. (how do you tell if a chicken is dehydrated?) I am dripping baby food squash and corn and some yogurt in to his mouth with a syringe, and he will swallow, but he is totally unable to stand now. I feel so bad for the poor boy and now I am starting to feel guilty about dragging him through the "life support" process and wondering if he CAN get better.[​IMG]
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

    4,871
    23
    251
    Jan 11, 2007
    If you set out a separate feeder /bowl with another type of feed such as grower (so no laer) then you will see the roo eat from that instead of the layer pellets .

    you might try a molasses flush in case it is something toxic (can't hurt might help):
    http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html
    "....LAXATIVE SOLUTIONS

    The following solutions or mixtures are recommended to flush the digestive system of toxic substances, most notably for treating birds exposed to botulism toxins.

    Molasses Solution

    Add one pint of molasses to 5 gallons of water

    Offer the drinking solution free-choice to the affected birds for about four hours. Treat severely affected birds individually if they cannot drink. Return the birds to regular water after the treatment period...."
     
  7. lovethechickens

    lovethechickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    153
    1
    131
    Feb 16, 2008
    Antioch California
    Hows the ol boy doing today?
     
  8. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    I'm concerned about the possibility of impaction..

    how is he?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by