Neutering Roosters? Anyone as crazy as me?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by my3chickens, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. my3chickens

    my3chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    183
    0
    109
    Apr 24, 2010
    Maryland
    I'm a first time chicken owner, purchased 3 chicks, was told all were pullets, NOT, two are roosters. They are 3 months old now and I'm attached to them so no chance of getting rid of them. Has anyone heard of anyone that's done this? My concern is the two fighting so I'm wondering if this will take care of it.
     
  2. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

    30,361
    159
    446
    May 14, 2008
    North Phoenix
    My Coop
    Eventually one will be the top dog and they will stop fighting (unless they are games).

    Neutered roos are worthless.
     
  3. Lotsapaints

    Lotsapaints Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2010
    Paso Robles, CA
    You can't find anyone to make capons out of them...if you could they make wonderful setters and they bring good money for eating....pretty much a lost art though. You never know they could get along and they might not only time will tell
     
  4. Choco Maran

    Choco Maran Chillin' With My Peeps

    730
    47
    153
    Jul 25, 2009
    Ribera New Mexico
    I have two sets of roosters that live together in a six by ten foot pen and both get along just fine. Two roos in each pen. They have grown up together and have never fought. One set is a Partridge rock and a mix breed white roo, and they other set is a Sliver Lace and Partridge rock. So I say try it. If they are getting along now leave them together. If you seperate you proably won't get them back together.
     
  5. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

    4,726
    142
    281
    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    Roosters are usually neutered (caponized) at a younger age, and it's typically done in order to make a meatier bird for the table. Perhaps some day, when backyard & indoor chickens are more common, many general vets will offer this service to their clients who keep chickens. I believe they're also working on a simple operation that can keep a roo from crowing.

    I think you're going to have other issues, that of having 2 roosters & only 1 hen. They are going to wear your hen out with too much attention from both of them. An ideal ratio is 1:10-12 hens.

    This is why I advise new chicken owners to not get too terribly attached to their chicks until they know for certain they're all keepers. Enjoy them & care for them well, but maybe hold off on knitting them their own personalized Christmas stocking until they've had more of a chance to grow.
     
  6. my3chickens

    my3chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    183
    0
    109
    Apr 24, 2010
    Maryland
    Thanks for all of the advice!! So far they have small spats, chest bumping a couple times a day, but other than that they are all buddies. Eventually I may have to get another hen to keep the other one company and separate them from the roosters. Luckily I live in a fairly rural area so crowing won't be an issue, thank goodness because I love to hear them crow.

    I guess I fell into the new chicken owner trap of becoming attached!! I did provide a good laugh for all the vets in my county, I think I called every one to see if they neutered roosters [​IMG]
     
  7. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

    4,726
    142
    281
    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    I love reading the books by James Herriot where he describes so vividly what his life was like as a country vet in England in the 1940's. It's interesting to learn that when he was going to veterinary school they focused most of their attention on care for horses, next was cattle, then sheep, pigs, and finally dogs & cats. Few people then would take their dogs & cats to a vet for care, I guess they were considered more dispensible or expendable. But by the time he began practice there were less horses to tend and more folks were requesting care for their dogs & cats and other pets.

    I imagine that if the backyard chicken movement continues to grow then more veterinarians will be trained in poultry care and offer more services for them. A man in our poultry club has a son in vet school, he says they're working on a simple operation that can de-crow a rooster. As more folks want to keep hens & roosters in suburban neighborhoods this will be a beneficial service to provide.
     
  8. my3chickens

    my3chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    183
    0
    109
    Apr 24, 2010
    Maryland
    There will be a lot of happy rooster owners if they perfect the de-crowing operation! I'm so glad that's one thing I don't have to worry about because I really do love to hear them crow.

    I also enjoy the books by James Herriot and am always looking for animal related books to read. Try "The Good, Good Pig" by Sy Montgomery.
     
  9. RachelFromTheBlackLagoon

    RachelFromTheBlackLagoon Chillin' With My Peeps

    879
    0
    139
    May 4, 2009
    Wallingford, CT
    Why don't you just get a bunch more hens? I bet they'd do fine together if they each had their own ladies.
     
  10. my3chickens

    my3chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    183
    0
    109
    Apr 24, 2010
    Maryland
    Rachel; I would love to have more but I have a really small coop, only fits 3-4 chickens. I have really worried myself sick about what to do and I know for a fact that I can't get rid of them. Who would have thought I would fall in love with my chickens!!

    I may have to take you up on your advice... I guess I'll be looking for a handyman to enlarge my coop!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by