Never raised geese, but would like to start

Discussion in 'Geese' started by Gomos Flock, Jan 26, 2017.

  1. Gomos Flock

    Gomos Flock New Egg

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    Jan 26, 2017
    Canyon Lake TX
    I've read the sticky but not sure if my idea is a good one.

    I want to get geese for foraging this year and have read the Chinese Brown are the best. I'm also starting over with a new flock of chickens which will be naked necks.

    I was told that the goslings and chicks may be ordered and raised at the same time. I'm thinking they would need to be separated because of growth and personality issues.

    I'm willing to order the goslings ahead of time so they are bigger because I also own a dog. He's afraid of feral cats so I think if I had a mean bird it would cool his jets. I've been told by a local old timer in my area than a mean male goose will take care of business.

    Is the guy yanking my chain?

    I only need 5 geese for foraging my five acres. I'm willing to order more or a different breed.

    Eventually the flock will include guinea hens as well.

    I appreciate all the information anyone is willing to share. I live in S. Central TX so it does get hot and unfortunately cold a few days in the winter.

    Thank you,
    MaryAnn
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

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    You probably would want to separate the goslings and chicks, not due to the goslings being aggressive towards them or anything like that, but because they grow so much faster and bigger they could accidentally crush a chick.

    I'm not sure what you mean by a gander 'taking care of business'. A gander is not likely to attack an aggressive dog or any big predator, if that's what you're thinking. Their sheer size and attitude may be a deterrent but in the face of an aggressive dog/coyote/etc the gander will likely go the other direction, unless he is trying to protect a mate on a nest, and even then the dog is still going to kill him, he has no chance against a big dog.

    You don't want mean geese. A mean goose is mean to humans. Do you want a big gander chasing you around the yard trying to bite you and pound you with his wings every time you go outside? Your goal should not be to raise the geese to be 'mean' but to raise them to be friendly and good watch dogs for predators, but don't expect at all that they're going to fight predators off or anything like that. Their presence may deter some smaller ones and some birds of prey, but don't count on that either.

    I love my geese, but in terms of predator protection, they are there to alert me to a predator if it shows up and that's it. They're not going to fight it off, they're not going to protect the other birds.

    For weeding though brown chinese sound like a good breed choice for you.
     
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  3. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do not separate them,let them get to know each other. Geese are territorial,and when they meet new animals,it can go so much badder then you really think.

    Geese are fun,and mean ganders do get business done.
     
  4. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

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    No, this is bad advice. You do not want to raise chicks and goslings in the same brooder. The goslings can and quite possibly will crush a chick accidentally, just by stepping on them while not watching where their big feet are.

    You can just as easily have them used to each other by raising them in separate brooders that they can see each other from.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2017
  5. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    X2

    I raise Calls and chicks together sometimes, but only in small numbers... not only will the goslings be and get much bigger, but the wetness they spread can be very detrimental to chicks... separating a very big brooder with mesh would work even... that way they will always 'know' each other but will prevent any mishaps...

    Geese *can be* very territorial, but are best for alerting not actively protecting... against smaller animals, yes, but full sized dogs are another matter... they are great for arial predator *deterrants* only... smaller raptors may think twice about swooping in if they are around, but even then they won't be effective towards bigger or more determined raptors...

    Make sure they get socialized with outside people that may visit you, mailman, etc... you want them to know who is allowed around, don't risk them going mean... mean and territorial are 2 different things...
     
  6. fowlplayy

    fowlplayy New Egg

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    Jan 28, 2017
    who's askin"
    I own two geese, one african hen and one Toulouse gander. Originally i had a pair of africans for breeding, but unfortunately a dog got him. So a dog will most definitely take down a gander.
    For the most part the geese coexist well with my other chickens and ducks. The Toulouse gander is overprotective of the hens, and if a rooster is picking on a hen, he steps in. Geese are wonderful and bright, so spend time with them. They grow fast!
    I bought a cheap plastic kiddie pool for them to splash in when they were smaller. Now they just wade in it.
    [​IMG]
    ^^Sahara being a cutie[​IMG]

    So yeah, get geese. Just don't encourage being mean, and spend time with them. They will steal your heart[​IMG]
     
  7. Gomos Flock

    Gomos Flock New Egg

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    Jan 26, 2017
    Canyon Lake TX
    Thank you to everyone for the advice you've provided. I was worried about brooding chicks and goslings together because of the growth rate and size of geese.

    I own a small dog and although old is still great at learning what he's allowed to do if done from the get go. He's a rescue and learned within a week that he was praised with positive reinforcement for good behavior. He never received that from the original owners.

    I misspoke when asking about a mean goose. I definitely don't want mean geese.

    The information for brooding is especially helpful. I have portable fences that can be reinforced inside the coop. This way I can order the chicks and goslings together, but they can see each other as they grow.

    Thank you again to everyone who have helped me with my questions.

    MaryAnn
     

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