New Babies Please Help! Bad Genetics?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by AQHARednecks, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. AQHARednecks

    AQHARednecks Out Of The Brooder

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    We purchased some SLW and bred them. We got our first batch that hatched this weekend. There are 6 chicks, all have something not right with them. They all have a crooked toe, and 4 of them have bulging eyes. I thought at first it was just the "ugly stage" of a just hatched chick but they've all fluffed out, and their eyes are still bulging and closed. Any idea what this could be? I am thinking bad genetics?

    We hatched out quail successfully earlier, so its not our *first* time with an incubator but we aren't experts by any means lol. We also hatched a Golden Pheasant that hasn't had any issues so I am not sure? The only thing I can think is bad genetics... but I want to check before I cull everything. PLEASE HELP!
     
  2. slackwater

    slackwater Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would vote bad genetics in the parent stock. Probably something that wasn't obvious until they were bred to each other.
     
  3. AQHARednecks

    AQHARednecks Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the quick response. I was leaning that way as well. Of course, both parents are fine APPEARING- or else I never would have bred them of course! Just frustrating, but I think I will be culling birds tonight. *Sigh*

    Would love to hear if anyone else has experienced this and if we're on the right track with this!
     
  4. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    I vote bad genetics. When breeding it's always safer to buy from two different sources. I bought 4 CM/s chicks were fine but a rooster from the birds died young and w/o a visibal cause. As I recall one of the chicks had a bad leg from them and had to be put down.
     
  5. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sounds like it could be a nutritional issue with the breeders? What kind of feed are they on and how long have you had them before setting a hatch?
     
  6. AQHARednecks

    AQHARednecks Out Of The Brooder

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    We have had the adults for about 6 months. They are on Layena plus free range time (have to be put up at night due to fox issues) so I don't think there would be an issue with nutrition?
     
  7. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    That's definately bad genetics. We had a hen one time that always threw chicks with bulging eyes. We had to cull her when we finally figured out which one it was, and have never had it happen again.
     
  8. AQHARednecks

    AQHARednecks Out Of The Brooder

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    OK next question with it then LOL..

    If this is a genetic thing- is there a way to tell if it is coming from the hen or roo? Should I just cull both?
     
  9. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Possibly neither. get another pair and out cross with the original birds. be sure to keep good records of the matings.

    The pair you have may just be too closely related from the same line and out crossing should straighten it out.
     
  10. FactoryFarmsAreRrong

    FactoryFarmsAreRrong New Egg

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    souds like a possible spike in incubator temp, ive read about that quite a bit. just a few degrees for just the right amout of time can cause somethng like this.

    Edited to remove yelling. Please don't type in capitals to make your point, it's rude. Just FYI the term 'culling' is not synonymous with killing. To cull a bird often just refers to removing it from a breeding project.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2010

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