New Birds

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by chipmunkridge, Nov 13, 2010.

  1. chipmunkridge

    chipmunkridge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 18, 2010
    Lancaster
    I just brought home some new birds from the Ohio National. They are young (under a year) as are the birds I want to introduce them to. At this point the new birds are happily living in an old pack-n-play in the garage. How long should I keep them separate before putting them out with the others? Outside now are 1 cochin cockerel, 2 cochin pullets and one elderly sebright hen. The new birds are Belgian d'Anvers a cockerel and 2 pullets, all are bantams. My plan is to introduce them at night so they all wake up together, on a day I am home to keep an eye on things. Any suggestions? How long before I move the new birds out?

    Susan
     
  2. certifiedchef

    certifiedchef Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Carmichael
    From what I have read the general rule is 30 days in solitary before introducing to your flock. One would think that birds from Ohio National would be clean and safe.. Good luck with the new kids
     
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    The Ohio Nationals is a show, any time you take birds to (or from) a show you are taking a risk. The birds there are supposed to be in NPIP flocks, but that doesn't test for much. There is always a chance of picking up some nasty (incurable) bug when large numbers of poultry are in close quarters.

    To be on the safe side, ALWAYS quarantine any new birds. If you take birds of your own to a show, quarantine them (yes, your own birds!) before putting them back in with the rest of your flock. Better to be safe than sorry.
     
  4. Noelg

    Noelg Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 5, 2010
    please please please

    follow STRICT bio- security and quarantine for the next 30 days!
    After a 3 week quarantine my whole flock is infected from birds i brought from a show. Now i can prolly never let one leave alive without fear of infecting the other persons flock. I'll know for sure when the test comes back from MSU.

    MG,MS ,MM makes them carriers for life , well worth the time and effort to make sure your home birds dont get sick from the new comers.

    I wish you luck! but be careful!!

    Noelg
     
  5. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Agree with everyone regarding biosecurity. I'm also including a link on integration. I have heard the whole "slip them in at night" thing and it is a crock. It doesn't work. I tried it last year and it failed spectacularly. I tried the integration method outlined in the link this year and had success all around.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=2593-adding-to-your-flock

    Good luck.
     
  6. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
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    Glad to see this post! I am battling the desire to introduce new birds too quickly. They're in the chicken tractor for now and it seems small and they seem like such nice hens lol! I have much more resolve now!
    I am curious what disease can show up after 14, 21, etc days. It seems like such a long incubation period but I suppose since it's not that it's the time for the disease to be present, but the time for the disease to begin showing visible symptoms.
     
  7. Noelg

    Noelg Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Morning!

    As it was explained to me... I brought in birds that had MG, they did not show symtoms because they are carriers, so even after a quarantine. No one bird showed symtoms till i merged the 2 groups. On day 31 noticed one with symtoms by day 34 it had hit every bird in my flock including the ones in the brooder, the new birds still showed no symtoms.


    I guessing thats how you would know where it came from at that point, not that it matters, If youve got it your done. Unless you want to infect someone elses coop. Nothing should leave your property alive. Thats where im at, mine have recovered well, but nothing can leave alive.

    I received lots of great advice, and i have been slowly getting some of it on board in my coop.

    Be vigilent, care for your new birds after the old, dont wear the same shoes from one area to another, put on a jacket or big shirt when you care for the new.
    Keep hand sanitizer handy.
    It is well worth the effort in the end to not have your whole flock infected,

    Noelg
     
  8. SparksNV

    SparksNV Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
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    Reading all of the stories about infecting your current hens with the purchase of new hens really is making me reconsider getting any more hens. I wanted to buy 2 more (a blue egg laying EE and a hen that lays the drk chocolate eggs). I think I will definitely put it on hold at least til late spring/summer - better weather to deal with multiple coops.

    Thank you for sharing your stories and warnings - as awful as it was it really is helping to make a difference for someone elses flock.
     
  9. Noelg

    Noelg Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Hey!

    Get your EE and a Welsummer for the dark choc eggs! [​IMG]

    Just get them as chicks and raise them yourself!!

    I LOVE my eggers!


    Noelg
     
  10. MomMommyMamma

    MomMommyMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2010
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    Yep l- I won't be buying any older birds ever again. Heck, I'd like to return them now after reading all that! But we'll do our best and hope for the best.
    What is MG?
     

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