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New chick mommy...have a few questions about temperature

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mom_to3cuties, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. mom_to3cuties

    mom_to3cuties Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 14, 2007
    Mid Missouri
    I have 3ish week old chicks that dd's class hatched in class. I am totally new to the chicken thing and was wondering a few things.

    I know I have read that you can lower the temp in the brooder by 5 degrees each week. Right now they are in the dining room and the house stays at a steady 75 degrees. When do you think I can leave the heat lamp off all the time?

    Right now I watch them and when they seem too warm I turn it off for a bit. They are totally fine with it off and will usually go to sleep. I am thinking that I will go down to a 40 watt from a 60 for another week or 2 and then 25 and they might be ready for no heat lamp by 6 weeks?

    I was also wondering if someone could maybe identify the kind of chicks they are. I would love for them to be hens that we can get eggs from and are good with the kids.
    Thanks, Angie

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  2. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    If they are in the house at 75 degrees as a constant 1 week should see them to a point where the heat lamp isn't needed. By six weeks you should have a good idea if they are hens or not?
     
  3. 4H kids and mom

    4H kids and mom Cooped Up

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    Mar 10, 2007
    Southern Wisconsin
    If your house is 75 degrees, then following the "law" of lowering their temp by 5 degrees a week, by week 4 they would no longer need the lamp for additional heat. Also, by 4 weeks, they will be fairly well feathered, so that will help them stay warmer too.

    However, all chicks are different. You'll need to watch them, and they will let you know what they need. If they are huddled together and cheeping loudly, they are cold. If they are as far away from the light as they can get and panting with open beaks, they are too hot. If they are walking happily around the box, eating and drinking, and chirping softly, they are just right. [​IMG]
     

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