New Chick Owner

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by TRISHO1127, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. TRISHO1127

    TRISHO1127 New Egg

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    I just bought five chicks, that I'm pretty sure are about a week old.
    I'm doing the research on what to do with them, but I was hoping more-experienced chicken owners might have some pointers.
    Anything would be appreciated.
    Thanks!!
     
  2. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Glad you joined us!

    Have you checked out the Learning Center (Very top of the page). It's a great place to start!

    Other than that, keep them warm and dry, free feed them a food suitable for chicks and keep their water fresh. Happy researching!
     
  3. EELover

    EELover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. TRISHO1127

    TRISHO1127 New Egg

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    Thanks guys... I did check out the learning area. I'm reading the one on the first 60 days again to make sure I have it all down. I was just wondering if anyone had any pointers that aren't part of that, you know, something that people learned from their experience over their research.
    They're getting baths tomorrow, and would you guys suggest going with the medicated feed over the regular feed? Also, I've got hay in the bottom of their little pen now, that's ok too right?
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2011
  5. KFaye

    KFaye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On the bottom of the brooder I have always used shavings once they have been a week. First I line it with newspaper so I can roll up the paper with shavings etc and toss. It is also easier to lay several layers of paper so you can just pick up the top, sheet roll it and toss. Also put your waterer and feeder about an inch off the ground to start so they will get less junk in their feeders. You can move those up as they get bigger. Keep them warm and love them alot. I will also set them around me each day and read a book or play with them so they are used to me. Nothing is more satisfying to see your chickens come running to you when you come out to see them! They're like puppy dogs!
     
  6. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I used shavings because they were easier for me to obtain, store and clean up. And I used medicated feed. Being new to the whole thing (in April 2010), I didn't want to take any chances. But that's a personal decision, not a right or wrong thing. You can research that and see what you are comfortable with.

    Can I ask why they are getting bathed? If their butts are poopy, you can usually clean the area with a warm, wet wash cloth.
     
  7. KFaye

    KFaye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with the Pasty Butt. I actually am calling one Pasty because she pasted up overnite and it was awful. I usually catch it quickly. It took 24 hours of monitoring to make sure she pooped again, I was worried she was clogged [​IMG]
     
  8. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    The most important advice beyond keeping the chicks the right temperature and fed and watered, is to handle them a lot to assure tameness.

    The thing to remember is baby chicks are born to fear anything coming at them from above, so always approach them slowly from the side. A brooder that is elevated and has a side access is a huge help.

    Also, I've found that training the chicks to be secure perched on the back of your hand or arm will be tremendously helpful later on when you have to handle them as adults. Chicks I've hand-perch trained can be moved so much more easily without all the nervous wing-flapping insecure chickens will resort to.

    To train them, simply slide your hand toward their feet and wait until they naturally walk up onto it. Do this whenever you need to pick them up. They will react to being picked up in a much more relaxed manner, and it'll carry over into adulthood.
     
  9. wolftracks

    wolftracks Spam Hunter

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    You'll find lots of information right here in this section on raising chicks.

    Something i do for the first 2 weeks is grind the feed even finer and I add a tablespoon of AVC to a quart sized water. Every since I started doing this I have never had one with pasty butt. Been doing this for years after getting a bunch in the mail that took us half the day to clean up.

    OOPS! and [​IMG] [​IMG] from California
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  10. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A lot of folks like to cuddle these chickens and make pets out of um. I will rub the chickens backs and chest but I'm not one to be picking up the chickens and acting like some folks do with these 2 pound dogs. To my way of thinking, if you make pets out of um then when they go out and range all day they lose a lot of the defensive ability nature gave them because they begin to think everything love them. I want them to know I will look after them and protect all of um, but when I'm not around they have to look after themselves. I don't say this is true but it what I believe and the way I handle it. This is the same reason I don't clip their wings. I want them to be able to run and fly if necessary.

    If the chickens never see the outside world then I don't suppose it matters.[​IMG] Dress um up and put lipstick on their little beaks if that what you're looking for.[​IMG]
     

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