New Chick won't sleep in the coop

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Abril1127, Apr 1, 2016.

  1. Abril1127

    Abril1127 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 20, 2015
    Tx Panhandle
    Hi guys,
    When I first set my 2 new chicks into the chicken pen, they went into the coop to sleep. That was about 3 weeks ago. Last week I noticed that they are now sleeping up on top of the door of the coop. (Door is just 2ft by 2 ft)They are together. There are 3 grown hens inside the coop and they each sleep on their own bars. Each bar has enough length for about 3 chickens.
    Twice I have picked them up and put them inside the coop. They slept on the floor. I can't help but wonder if "Big Birtha" is not letting them in the coop. She is sort of stationed by the door and can easily peck anything that comes in.

    What can I do? Should I just let it be?
     
  2. TimCline

    TimCline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Inez, ky
    If it were me I'd probably just let it play out as long as there are no other problems. How old are the chicks?
     
  3. Abril1127

    Abril1127 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 20, 2015
    Tx Panhandle
    They are just over 2 months.
     
  4. TimCline

    TimCline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2016
    Inez, ky
    You could try placing them on the roosts after dark. If the coop is not lighted and you put them on a roost next to each other they will most likely stay till morning. Or you can just let them figure it out. I doubt it's a bullying problem. They are still pretty young.
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    NW Oregon
    Two month old chicks and full grown hens often do not mix well. Your chicks are getting hazed by the dominant hen.

    If you can, it may be best to keep these chicks separate for at least another month with wire in between the two groups so that the older hens can see the younger but not have access.

    Integrating younger birds into an existing flock usually takes time. The younger birds will be hazed for a time (often a week or two, or longer). The worst times are at the feeders and roosting time. To help with that, provide feeders in different locations and even different locations for roosting. Then allow integration during the day in open yard time. After awhile, you'll find the groups mixing at night too.

    As they mingle during the day, you will have to provide places for the younger birds to run and hide until they are accepted by the flock. Remove any older flock member that is overly aggressive in hazing (ie draws blood or holds younger birds down and pounds away pecking).

    You will see the new pullets hazed most heavily until they come into lay, then often they integrate (after a few squabbles over the nests). The adult laying hormones often give confidence to the younger birds.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    If they are already spending the day together without blood shed and the chicks are getting enough to eat and drink,
    I would suggest putting up a separate roost a bit lower than the one the bigger birds use.
    Put some sort of barrier up so she can't nail a chicks coming in the door from her roost.
    Some folks have put up barriers to separate the roost(s) into 'sections'.
     

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