New chickens not getting along

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chanty, Oct 23, 2011.

  1. chanty

    chanty Out Of The Brooder

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    I got 2 new reds yesterday (a type of Rhody), very docile and easy-going with people. I already had 3 other girls, a 5 month old buff orpington (she is huge...no eggs yet though), a 4 month old chanteclerc and the reason I'm writing, a 4 month old brown leghorn (that if very small, maybe a banty). The two reds have taken to harrassing her, the other two protect her often but she little cocoa is often shunned. She stays alone in the coop or goes outside the run because the new girls are still hesitant to do so. I know it is still early yet and they are finding their place but I am worried about her. Any advise...suggestions?[​IMG]
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    First, you did no bio-security? Hmmmmm

    Second, I find it better not to just throw new hens together. Too much stress and pecking order flare ups. Better to intro a bit more slowly.
     
  3. chanty

    chanty Out Of The Brooder

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    what the heck is bio-security. I put new chickens together last spring and it took about a week or so to iron out. I'm hoping the same for this group. I never new about slow integration.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    If you have a healthy flock, just bringing in some birds from another flock, without putting them in isolation for a month to see if they have any diseases, as they could easily transmit or be carriers of diseases that could literally wipe out your current flock. OK, it doesn't happen every time, but just once is too many. There are a great number of stories here of people having made that mistake and paid a very high price. It is sad.
     
  5. TinyChickenLady

    TinyChickenLady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Bio-security is putting the new girls in isolation for a while to be sure they didn't bring any new diseases into your already existing brood.
    The slow integration kind of works the same way. After you're sure the new girls are disease free, intoduce them slowly (and possibly caged up) so they are all exposed to each other but don't yet have the opportunity to hurt each other. Thay way, when you decide to remove them from their "introduction cage" they are all used to each other and hopefully, won't have much reason to peck each other.
     
  6. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    A slower introduction of new birds is to use a cage within the coop method, or to divide your coop in two using some netting. After a week of smelling, seeing and hearing each other through the netting, the introduction can happen. Integration often goes a little easier if the birds have spent some time getting used to each other from a slight distance. The chicken has a very strict social order. Each one knows its place and role within that order. They get very stressed when that order is disturbed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011
  7. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    If you don't do bio-security (I haven't, and have had no issues, but better safe than sorry!) I find it takes about a week or two for them to work things out.. Though it's been a month and my delaware hen is such a brat when it comes to sharing a roost... [​IMG]

    As long as they aren't doing it relentlessly, I wouldn't worry about it much. Make sure they have lots to keep them occupied.
     
  8. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:Well, this is true, but it's more than that. For me it includes no visitors who own chickens and different shoes for the coop and town (especially the feed store.) Some diseases can even be introduced in hatching eggs brought in from outside. Some people use a foot bath to dip visitors' shoes in, for example.
     
  9. chanty

    chanty Out Of The Brooder

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    May 29, 2011
    They all sit on the same perch at night, it is just big enough for all five of them. Little cocoa stays at one end well guarded and the reds are at the other. They seem to get along as long as there is at least one older hen near the little ostracized one. They won't come out of the coop though and I put food and water in the run and out so there is no food hoarding. I will try to be patient and see if it improves in a week or two. Thanks!
     
  10. DebbieDee

    DebbieDee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have the same issue. My 2 leghorns are mean to my younger 3. At roost time they chase them on top of the nest boxes.So I go in and move them around and calm them for about 10-15 minutes then a is good. As for food yes the 2 are pigs they bully the 3 so I spread the feeders out and the scraps...[​IMG]
     

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