New chickens on the roost

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Wyatt0224, Apr 28, 2016.

  1. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is the first time I've ever owned chickens and just recently I've moved them outside. We have one Rhode Island Red rooster, six silkies and four black australorps. Within in the first few nights of them going outside they tried all sleeping on the ground smushed into a corner. I wasn't going to have that so started putting them on the roost bar. I've noticed that some of them want to be with specific chickens next to them and even some who want to be by themselves. Will this have an affect on if they're are "closer" to some more then others? Will they always want to roost next to them? And will they stay together when they're outside the coop in their run?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Some birds bond more with other birds, just like people do. Friends will always stick together for the rest of their lives. Most younger birds sleep on the floor in a pile, it normal and they will move to the roost when they are ready. My concern would be if that RIR rooster mates the silkies, he could hurt them.
     
  3. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, they'll generally stick together outside. Chickens have a pecking order, so chickens low in the pecking order aren't allowed too close to chickens higher in the pecking order. Chicken Rules. I've found that the higher ones generally take the top roost, and the lower ones have to find a spot that isn't too close to their superiors. They don't always roost next to a particular chicken, but they do follow the rules of the pecking order. Anyone can sit next to the rooster, though, even though he's at the top.
     
  4. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some birds bond more with other birds, just like people do. Friends will always stick together for the rest of their lives. Most younger birds sleep on the floor in a pile, it normal and they will move to the roost when they are ready. My concern would be if that RIR rooster mates the silkies, he could hurt them.


    Yes that is also what I thought! We ended up getting six black australorps but they were straight run and of course 4/6 ended up being roosters and so then we bought five Rhode Island Red chicks that were supposed to be sexed hens but we'll see. I am worried though about my rir rooster because he is a big boy.
     
  5. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, they'll generally stick together outside. Chickens have a pecking order, so chickens low in the pecking order aren't allowed too close to chickens higher in the pecking order. Chicken Rules. I've found that the higher ones generally take the top roost, and the lower ones have to find a spot that isn't too close to their superiors. They don't always roost next to a particular chicken, but they do follow the rules of the pecking order. Anyone can sit next to the rooster, though, even though he's at the top.



    That is very interesting about roost if with the rooster because there's always one Silkie that wants to be by him.
     
  6. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's interesting. None of my hens care too much for my rooster. Is she at the bottom of the pecking order?
     
  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Some hens, especially those at the bottom of the pecking order will exchange frequent matings with the rooster for protection from the more dominant hens. Also at night many hens will bicker to be the one next to the rooster because he again will provide protection from predators, he should be willing to give his life defending his girls. A good rooster is invaluable, a poor rooster is a pain.
     
  8. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No actually she's probably one of the top two hens. It's very weird because she's also one of the biggest three Silkie hens. She always wants to be emit to someone on the roost yet my other big Silkie hen doesn't mind being alone on the roost and will be the last one to hop off of the roost a good while after everyone else is off.
     
  9. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They do bicker a lot! It's funny because they'll crane their necks over the bodies in between them and won't stop peeping about it. They usually don't calm down until the sun goes down and they can't see.
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Yep that's typical roost behavior, it funny to watch, they always sound like someone is being killed, especially my bantams, goofy birds.
     

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