"New" Chickens Still Not Laying...Why?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by uglyrhino, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. uglyrhino

    uglyrhino New Egg

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    Sep 8, 2016
    We introduced "new" (new to us) chickens last Saturday night. We already have a number of other chickens. There are 20 of the "new" ones and, although I realize it is stressful, I am wondering how long we should expect to wait until they resume laying eggs (January hatch, we were told)? I'm concerned my husband got "taken" and that these are not laying. He didn't get a receipt, either. I'm just wondering how long before I should contact the person we purchased them from? We thought they would have started laying by now. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. CluckerCottage

    CluckerCottage Chillin' With My Peeps

    moving coop is very stressful on chickens.
    it's not just a new environment. they are understandably nervous with the "other" chickens that were already in your flock.
    make sure they have what they need for layer ration, keep your eye out for any bullying.
    I have been through this as well, years ago. same time of year, too.
    also, hens slow down or stop laying when they are approaching their molt/molting. offer extra proteins for them. I am giving feather fixer feed in addition to layer ration.
    I have several barred rock hens that are in full swing now. no eggs from them for 2 weeks at least. they should be back online soon.
    good luck, hope all goes well with your new girls.
     
  3. MnBFitz

    MnBFitz Out Of The Brooder

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    We have found that every time we introduce "new" hens to our flock it usually takes anywhere from 2 weeks to even 2 months before they start laying. Chickens are funny creatures and get stressed easily.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Ditto Dat^^^

    It can also depend on how well your integration went, if you observed any bio-quarantine process, how much space you have, what you are feeding compared to previous owners, and a plethora of other things.

    Not sure a receipt would offer any satisfaction of a non productive bird anyway, unless there was a guarantee specified in the purchase and recorded on receipt.
    Usually chickens are sold 'as is'...and buyer beware.
     
  5. uglyrhino

    uglyrhino New Egg

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    Now, we have gone from the newer chickens not laying to ALL of the chickens not laying. We went from about 18 eggs/day to 12,8,6,4,2,1, and ZERO! We have tried letting them out of the chicken yard, but that hasn't helped. We used to have them out before, but lost a lot to a fox this year. Now we are feeding birds and getting nothing in return. At this point, hubby is saying if we don't see a change by the end of the month, we'll be getting rid of them. So frustrating! We've had chickens for eight years and never experienced this.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Letting them out to free range, they have started laying in range area.

    How old are your older chickens?
    They can be stressed out from the new additions too...and it's only been a week or so.

    More info on total number and ages of birds, size of coop, what you are feeding could narrow down a solution.


    In 8 years you've never had a chicken stop laying to molt in the fall/winter?
     
  7. uglyrhino

    uglyrhino New Egg

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    We have had them lay eggs up in the barn, but we aren't finding them there either. We have never gone to so few or no eggs, even if some are molting. We have all ages. The oldest are likely not laying (although our one Aracauna still lays an occasional greenish egg from time to time). The coop has housed more birds in the he past without issue. We've introduced newer chickens at other times and not experienced anything like this. Feed is the same as always: layer pellets, scratch from time to time, and scraps of fruits and vegetables. If the regulars were stressed from the introduction of the others, we'd have understood a decrease in the egg laying if had immediately happened, but the way it has gone had been a mystery.
     

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