new chickens

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by cahooneggs, Oct 4, 2015.

  1. cahooneggs

    cahooneggs New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Oct 4, 2015
    [​IMG]So I have 2 questions today. I have 6 production red hens. 5 lay everyday and have been laying since June. One is not laying. Can anyone tell me why? Also I plan to get about 12 to 14 more in the near future. What are the steps to mixing them with the ones I have right now and the new ones. I want to buy them as grown hens. Last question what is the best chicken I should buy that gets along with the other ones. Also that are great Egg layers? Thank you. The picture is of the one that doesn't lay.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2015
  2. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

    25,582
    2,156
    438
    May 14, 2014
    Montana
    Welcome to BYC. Glad you decided to join our flock. Are you sure the PR that's not laying is a pullet and not a cockerel? Unlike Red and Black Sex Links, Production Reds cannot be sexed by color and the hatcheries that sell them will usually only guarantee 90% sexing accuracy. As for adding more layers to your flock, I would suggest Black Sex Links which are very friendly and hardy, egg laying machines. They should get along well with your PRs (assuming they are properly integrated using the "look but don't touch" method") and they will actually outlay your PRs. I raised both of the sex link varieties and PRs for years (along with dozens of other breeds and hybrids), and my sex links have been my best layers, consistently churning out more than 300 large, brown eggs per hen per years. I've have been especially impressed with the Black Sex Links' persistence in laying in really cold winter weather and the size of their eggs; double yolks are not uncommon. Please feel free to ask any other questions you may have. We are here to help in any way we can. Cheers.
     
  3. ethancchicken

    ethancchicken Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    22
    May 20, 2015
    I will check. Can u give me the correct way to mix the chickens together. I know they need to be separated but what else.
     
  4. ethancchicken

    ethancchicken Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    22
    May 20, 2015
     
  5. EggyTheHen

    EggyTheHen Chillin' With My Peeps

    42
    32
    64
    Oct 1, 2015
    It may be a cock. Hope you find out soon ;)
     
  6. ethancchicken

    ethancchicken Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    22
    May 20, 2015
    I know its not a rooster

     
  7. EggyTheHen

    EggyTheHen Chillin' With My Peeps

    42
    32
    64
    Oct 1, 2015
    Hmm... Well then I don't know :p sorry
     
  8. cahooneggs

    cahooneggs New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Oct 4, 2015
    Can anyone tell me how to mix the chickens properly.
     
  9. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

    84,499
    3,807
    646
    Jun 15, 2012
    Washington
    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)
     
  10. N F C

    N F C dem crazy bones Premium Member

    35,964
    14,473
    676
    Dec 12, 2013
    Wyoming
    Welcome to BYC!

    The first step to mixing new birds with an existing flock is isolation. The new birds should be kept separate for approximately 30 days to be sure they won't be introducing an illness or pest to the existing flock.

    The next step is "look but don't touch". That means the 2 groups need to be able to see each other but not be able to peck and hurt each other. You can separate your coop and run space with chicken wire or poultry netting. Let them have a chance to get used to each other 3-4 weeks. Then it's time to take the divider down and let them mix, be sure to have extra feeders and waterers out so no one gets chased away from food/water. You can also let them get to know each other free ranging where the new birds can run and hide from the existing flock. Some people use crates or other types of pens during the look/don't touch time but since you're not getting chicks, the larger new girls will need room.

    Hope that helps.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by