New chicks outside won't come back in

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by kjxoxo1, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. kjxoxo1

    kjxoxo1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 16, 2011
    Okay help!!!! Please!!!! I have Thanksgiving born chicks /guineas.....I have about 65 total. I finally moved them into the coop this past weekend but they would not go into the run. Today I put food in the run and lured them outside...great right.... Wrong!!! I went to go check on them and they were all huddled together....it's 40 degrees here. They wouldn't go back inside. Do you think they don't know how to go back inside? I'm worried but I tried to catch them and was only able to get about 6 and put them inside....any advice is appreciated. They are Cornish hens, broilers, black autralorp, variety of guineas.
    Thanks!!
     
  2. buckbeak

    buckbeak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Get a flashlight and shine it into the doorway where they are supposed to go. Then herd them toward it and get them inside. You will probably have to do this for several nights until they know what to do. You need to get them inside. They are too young to be out in that temperature.
     
  3. buckbeak

    buckbeak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Did you get them inside?
     
  4. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Treats and bribes always work but need to start in the light. Sometimes if they wont come back in its bc they do not know where they belong and need coop and sleeper time for a few weeks to train them to know where home is.
     
  5. ADozenGirlz

    ADozenGirlz The Chicken Chick[IMG]emojione/assets/png/00ae.png

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    I would leave a light on inside the coop and they should find their way inside when it gets dark. If not, it should be easier to corral them in the dark if you must.
    When you do finally get them back inside, my suggestion is always to keep new coop residents of any age confined to the coop for about a week or so until they have settled down from the stress of the move and learned that the coop is where they are supposed to roost and lay eggs. Then, keep them confined to the run for another week or two (if you free-range) before letting them out of the run, for the same reason. They need the familiarity reinforced.
     
  6. kjxoxo1

    kjxoxo1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No..... Sadly I could not get them in.... The guineas were way too fast for me!!! My run is kinda low in height and I'm very tall so running them down was not a viable option for my head!!!! Soooooo, I ended up putting a brooder light outside ( I already have one inside) and putting three different piles of about 6 inches deep of pine shavings and said a big prayer!!! I went out there early this morning and they were eating!! They were not huddled or anything!!! I looked inside the coop and there were only 5 in there....there were about 20 inside. The rest of those went outside!!!! I'm thinking they just love the outside!!!! I'm just so happy I didn't lose any. One half of my run is covered. Thanks so much for the replies!! This is my very first time raising chickens.
     
  7. fifelakelooper

    fifelakelooper Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 9, 2009
    fife lake, mi.
    After being under a brooder light they are scared to go in to a dark coop so leave a light on inside for 10 minutes or so after dark. If that doesn't work...are there older hens/chicks inside waiting to kick their butt when the come in?? I had both of these issues happen.
     
  8. kjxoxo1

    kjxoxo1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for responding..... All the chicks are the same age...they will be 5 weeks on Monday. I've kept the brooder light on inside the entire time..... They have been in their new coop a week on this upcoming Sunday. I did not have a light on in the run thinking that when it gets dark they will go back inside....they didn't. This morning when I checked on them, lots more were outside than was originally. The coop run is enclosed and about 9 feet of it is covered. The remaining 9 feet is uncovered. They seemed content although I felt it is too cold for them. I was just worried that they didn't know to go inside as there is not a hen or any chickens with experience to lead them. Also, I never talked to them so now I haven't trained them to my voice.... Like calling them to eat, etc. Which I am now thinking is something I should have done.
     
  9. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've found with chicks moved to a big coop-and-run that some of them will take ages to venture outside for the first time. The first chicks I raised, I put them in the coop when they were 5 weeks old. The pop hole was open every day, but they didn't go outside (apart from very quickly just poking their heads out the door) till they were about 9 weeks old...

    Others have acted just like your ones - can't wait to rush off outside but then don't know how to get back inside again! If you can't herd them all inside, you can always wait till well after dark and just go into the run and pick them up one by one (or two or three at a time) and carry them inside. If you're really worried about the low temps you might have to do this, even though with 65 chicks it will take you ages...

    P.S. I'm not sure as I've never kept them, but this might be a bit more difficult with guineas than with chickens - I've heard they're just naturally much less tame, much more wary of predators and much more noisy if anything alarms them. Have fun!
     
  10. kjxoxo1

    kjxoxo1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @Gypsy. Lol have fun!!!!!! Fun is right!! I got worn out catching 6 of them!!! [​IMG]
    Thanks for responding!! I'm learning something new everyday day!!
     

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